DAVID GEISER / SUMMER OF LOVE

Art Ventures Gallery
Oct 11, 2017 9:10PM

The Summer of Love was a time of huge upheaval. Young Americans were rebelling against the war in Vietnam, the specter of the military industrial complex, and Nixon’s presidency as the Civil Rights and Gay Rights movements were just beginning to take hold. All these issues were being threshed out within the underground comix of the time.  In the 1960s, David Geiser made a name for himself in this scene. In North Beach and the Mission District, he’d rub elbows with the likes of Robert Crumb, Charles Bukowski, and Hunter S. Thompson — all the while keeping notebooks about the people he met. “I learned to draw by going to cafes and bars and drawing people,” he recalls. Those notebooks became edgy, subversive comic books with names like Demented Pervert, Uncle Sham, and Pain.  Educated at the University of Vermont, the Ecole des Beaux Arts, and the Arts Student League, Geiser soon pursued a fine arts career, and eventually left California for New York in 1978.   In recent years, he has taken a hybridized approach that combines an exaggerated figurative style with a painter’s approach to texture. In his Oracle series, Geiser brings his dark sensibility up to date with work that was inspired by Federico Fellini’s “Clowns” and Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot. In the color-saturated paintings, he presents the viewer with a series of tricksters, shaped by Geiser’s impression of the mad Zen monks, Loki the Nordic god, and the “court jesters that offer humor, truth, and wisdom in the face of foolish power and ignorance.” At a time when the news cycle brings regular servings of the latter, Geiser reminds us to embrace the humor in chaos and absurdity amidst the madness.

                                                                                         Oracle, Oil, gold leaf, varnish, m/m on board, 6' x 3’, 2017

Art Ventures Gallery