Visual Culture

What the Rooms from 6 Famous Paintings Would Look Like Today

Art history is rich with paintings of home interiors, and many of them depict the artists’ personal spaces, teaching us a great deal about how they lived and worked. Take ’s Red Studio (1911), for instance. His readily identifiable paintings and objects fill the space, stacked against walls and resting on surfaces. Not only did Matisse curate a mini-retrospective of his own work within the painting, but he showed us how his studio was arranged. Paintings like these could be considered historical records that provide great insight into the lives of artists.
The creative agency NeoMam, commissioned by home-improvement service website HomeAdvisor, has created six realistic CG renderings of rooms based on famous art-historical interiors.
Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

’s The Bedroom (1888) shows his modest room in Arles, France, and gives us an intimate look into his personal life. The artist himself said the painting was intended to evoke peace and relaxation. According to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, the strongly contrasting colors were actually a result of discoloration over many years, and the walls and doors were originally purple, not the blue we see today.
Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

, the Midwestern painter best known for his puzzling and bucolic depictions of rural America—most notably the famous American Gothic (1930)—shows us this charming nook in his 1928 painting The Sun Shine on the Corner. Its muted, earthy palette adds to its sense of invitation.
Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Pioneer of abstraction ’s 1909 painting Interior (My Dining Room) is as much about exploring color and texture as it is about showing us his home. The painting’s eclectic palette gives the space a sense of personality.
Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

The warmth of the bare wood in Russian ’s 1913 painting Interior makes for an inviting scene. Korovin was well-known for his landscapes, portraits, and still lifes; the rose and beige hues throughout this painting, along with the winter snow just beyond its window, makes for a quiet, comforting environment.
Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

artist ’s 1991 work Interior With Restful Paintings shows us a chic, cool room. The painting, which represents Lichtenstein’s mature style, is from the artist’s “Interiors” series, in which he rendered domestic environments often inspired by furniture advertisements. There was always an artwork within the artwork; here, it’s above the couch. It’s an extra treat to see his flat pop imagery rendered in 3D.
Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Image courtesy of HomeAdvisor.

Eduard Petrovich Hau’s richly detailed 1835 watercolor Empress Alexandra Feodorovna’s Sitting Room, Cottage Palace, St. Petersburg, Russia shows us the glamorous interior that belonged to Russia’s last empress. Its rich ornamentation is rendered down to the last detail.
Wallace Ludel is an Editorial Intern at Artsy.