Tale of two cities

Brendan McDonnell
Oct 15, 2014 7:47PM

Brendan McDonnell, Manuel Masello.

 

9/28/14

 

20th Century Art History

 

            The theme for our project is a collection of images taken by Rauschenberg, and a series of paintings made by Richard Estes, Charles Jarobe and Gus Heinze. With the use of photography, and the photorealistic nature of the paintings of the cities of Boston and New York City. Instead of using abstract images and amazing paintings that hold a hidden meaning of some sort, we wanted this to be a straight forward as possible, allowing the viewer to immediately know what they are looking at. The reason as to why there is such a small amount of pieces feature is because we have seen a few galleries and we agree that sometimes it is somewhat tedious that couldn’t see all of the pieces right in front of me, but instead had to walk around. In addition, with these pieces being so few we could have them on a single wall, allowing numerous people to look upon them at the same time and hopefully spark conversation of different opinions and viewpoints.  Another reason why I believe that this concept would work well is because of how similar the city of Savannah is to the cities featured in these pieces.  All three cities are big tourist attractions, all having their fair share of events, parades, and other popular annual events. They also share a similarity of having the largest ports on the east coast.

We also found that several of the contrasts between the paintings and pictures very interesting. For instance, all of the Rauschenberg photos are in black and white, while all of the paintings were done in color. Also, the pictures depict an older depiction of these cities while the paintings were made in more current times. We thought that the indication of the passage of time through not only the look of the works but the use color would be an interesting visual contrast. Another interesting part of our concept is that painting, the older of the two mediums we chose is depicting the present, while photography, which is the youngest is depicting the past version of these cities.

 

Brendan McDonnell