Jeremy Deller at a Glance:

British Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale
May 22, 2013 2:16AM

1. Sacrilige Greenwich, 2012. Courtesy of the Artist, art: concept, Paris, Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York, and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photo: Jeremy Deller.

Stonehenge is possibly the most famous site in the UK, but of course no one knows what it is or what it was used for. For Sacrilege, I wanted to come up with something specifically about Stonehenge, and by association our ancestors. I had been thinking about how to do this for a long time and decided it would be best to create an inflatable replica of the prehistoric site. Visitors would be invited to jump and play inside of it. Stonehenge is actually very big, but it's hard to tell since it's been roped off since 1977. You usually can't get very close to it. I see that restriction as an opportunity. Glasgow Green is also very large, so making this plastic replica at life size – at one hundred and forty feet wide – in public space will give visitors an idea of how big Stonehenge really is. But the point is also for it to be a pleasant experience. The piece has an inflatable floor, otherwise you wouldn't be able to bounce on it.— Jeremy Deller 

2. Jeremy Deller & Alan Kane: from Folk Archive, 2005, Snowdrop the Mechanical Elephant by the Clare Family, Egremont, Cumbria, 2004. Courtesy of the Artists. 

3. The Spoils of War (Memorial for an Unknown Civilian), 2008. Maquette of the destroyed car on a plinth. Courtesy of the Artist, art: concept, Paris, Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York, and The Modern Institute/Toby Webster Ltd, Glasgow. Photo James O Jenkins.

4. Acid Brass, 1997, Performance in Regents Park, London, 2006. Courtesy of the Artist. 

5. “It is what it is: Conversations about Iraq”, 2009. The car on display at the Imperial War Museum, London, 2011. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo by Jeremy Deller.

6. The History of the World, 1997

“I drew this diagram about the social, political and musical connections between house music and brass bands – it shows a thought process in action. I later made it into a wall painting. It was about Britain and British history in the twentieth century and how the country changed from being industrial to post-industrial. It was the visual justification for the musical project, Acid Brass. Whithout this diagram, Acid Brass would not have a conceptual backbone.”— Jeremy Deller

British Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale
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