"A Distant Embrace" Series by Robert Hite

Carrie Haddad Gallery
Jul 23, 2018 2:52PM

To truly appreciate Hite’s work, an education in the history of visual arts is not necessarily crucial; it is, however, essential that the viewer knows how to feel. Now for decades, Hite has been doing the lion’s share of the work, striving to interpret both the ethos and pathos of human connection; what is left as a prerequisite is simply awareness, to know that you are integral to the latticework of sadness and solace that is reflected in Hite’s purposefully crafted textures.

Robert Hite
After the Fire, 2017
Carrie Haddad Gallery


Hudson, NY - Too often, it seems, the impact of great art is hopelessly diluted by too academic of an approach. “Frankly, these days, without a theory to go with it, I can't see a painting,” quips Tom Wolfe in The Painted Word, his 1974 critique of the New York art scene; and, in many ways, little has changed. Before art can be a talking point or an investment, it must first and foremost be an experience, a means of communication – the purpose which fuels the heat of Robert Hite’s Hudson Valley 1840-church-turned- studio far more than the fire in the woodstove.

Robert Hite
Clementine , 2017
Carrie Haddad Gallery

Born in 1956, Robert Hite spent his childhood just outside of Bowling Green, a small town in rural Virginia. Building upon his formative experience in a racially divided American South, Hite travelled extensively throughout the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, and South America, studying the transitory themes of home and disenfranchisement that would shape his artistic vision. His work has shown widely, most notably in solo shows at The Nassau County Museum in 2011, and the Berkshire Museum in 2016. Hite was also awarded a John Simon Guggenheim fellowship for Fine Arts in 2014. His upcoming show at Hudson’s celebrated Carrie Haddad Gallery marks a significant step in the artist’s evolution: the debut showing of Hite’s A Distant Embrace series combines the mediums of sculpture, painting, and photography with his experience in Production Design in an impactful new perspective on his narrative imagery.

Robert Hite
Dave, 2017
Carrie Haddad Gallery

“It’s just another way of creating narrative style images,” Hite explains. “I hope viewers are stimulated by it enough to create their own interpretations and stories via the images; I try to avoid making my work so edged that there is not room there for the viewer to move themselves.”

Robert Hite
Migration House, 2017
Carrie Haddad Gallery

Also on display will be a selection of the reclaimed wood and metal dwelling sculptures that have become Hite’s signature work. Integral to the completion of each sculpture in this series—including Migration House, a 9’ x 22’ piece currently on display at the Albany Airport through 2020—is its photographic documentation in carefully selected outdoor locations in the Hudson Valley: an ongoing body of work Hite calls Imagined Histories. The haunting, large-scale image of Migration House, as well as other representations from the series, will be on view as well.


The show, featuring Hite and other photographic artists, will be open at Carrie Haddad Gallery on 622 Warren Street in Hudson, New York, from August 1st to September 16th, with an Artist’s Reception on Saturday, August 4th from 5-7pm.

Carrie Haddad Gallery