Environmental Art in China: where does nature begin and end?

China Residencies
Aug 16, 2013 2:45PM

Jay BrownLijiang Studio's director, tells us about one of the most marking projects created by resident artists. Read his account of Katalog's mushroom sculptures, a disastrous hail storm, homemade ice-cream and bucketfuls of toads: 

"Two American artists in a collective called Katalog proposed art based on energy cycles around the farm. Cycles of day and night, growth and decay, like the process of rotting wood that enables mushrooms to grow. The artists used mushrooms as their medium, they made sculptures and installations starting from mushroom spores, installing them as filters in places that might want some bioremediation.

Every week during their residency, they conducted public research into the surroundings from their mobile lab: a natural history museum on a tricycle. They presented their findings in a continuously open studio, in drawing sessions, and microscope sessions. With their enthusiasm, we experimented with making everything ourselves. We even made our own beer. The farmers here were interested to see that Americans who had come from so far away and had access to so much, would be willing to spend so much effort to make something from scratch...

Read the rest here

China Residencies
Get the Artsy app
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play
Jenna Gribbon, Luncheon on the grass, a recurring dream, 2020. Jenna Gribbon, April studio, parting glance, 2021. Jenna Gribbon, Silver Tongue, 2019