April 14, 2015: Design Miami Heads to Hong Kong & Artist Romero Britto Sues Apple

Opening

In New York …

A group of gallerists and art professionals, including Muriel Guépin of Muriel Guépin Gallery and Karen Boyer of Elements in Play, convenes at Brooklyn Art Space to offer “An Introduction to the Art Market” at 7 p.m.; David Reed will lead a tour of the “On Kawara—Silence” exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum at 6 p.m.


In Los Angeles …

“Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography” opens at The J. Paul Getty Museum.


In London …

Carol Bove: The Plastic Unit” opens at David Zwirner; Robert Therrien opens at Gagosian Gallery; “Taus Makhacheva: Vababai Vadadai!*” opens at Narrative Projects.


In Milan …

“80! Molteni” opens at Galleria D’Arte Moderna di Milano.


In Cologne …

Werner Herzog & Hercules Segers: Hearsay of the Soul” opens at Wallraf–Richartz–Museum & Fondation Corboud.


Today’s Notable News

Design Miami plans to expand to Hong Kong in 2017, using the same team as for its fairs in Miami and Basel. Purportedly tempted to created a fair in Beijing several years ago, Hong Kong now seems the better choice, due to Art Basel’s success in the city as well as Hong Kong’s current hold on the international art market. (via The Art Newspaper)

Five galleries in Singapore’s Gillman Barracks—a group of 17 contemporary art spaces in pre-war barracks—will not be renewing their leases with the facility. The group, which cited the underdevelopment of the site as reason, includes the Drawing Room, Space Cottonseed, Silverlens, Equator Art Projects, and Tomio Koyama Gallery. (via The Art Newspaper)

Artist Romero Britto is suing Apple, as well as London design firm Karl Maier, Ltd., for using designs too similar to his artwork in Apple’s “Start Something New” campaign. Britto’s lawyer, who mistook the campaign for the artist’s own work when he first saw it, is demanding that Apple cease using the campaign image and pay millions to Britto in compensation. (via the Miami Herald)

Madison Square Park-area residents in NYC are enraged over Fata Morgana, a forthcoming gigantic public sculpture by Teresita Fernández, which they believe will inhibit natural sunlight and block trees from view during its nine-month stay in the park. Organizer Madison Square Park Conservancy upholds that the project only engages with a small percentage of the park’s space and will not inhibit normal activities. (via DNAinfo)

An exhibition of Western WWII photography—including Alfred Eisenstaedt’s iconic V-J Day in Times Square (1945)—slated to open at the Metenkov House Museum of Photography in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and promoted by the British Embassy, has been called off, and the museum has been closed. The shutdown was likely engineered by the Russian secret services and is thought to be due to political unrest over world leaders’ upcoming boycott of a celebration of the end of Russia’s involvement in WWII. (via artnet News)

The Guggenheim has announced its 2015 fellows, a list 173-strong and featuring Mary Kelly and Mel Chin. The fellows represent a wide range of disciplines, from performance art, to visual art, to natural and social sciences. (via Artforum)

The Chicago Architecture Biennial has announced the line-up of some 60 architects who will feature in its inaugural edition, which runs from October of this year to the following January. The event is the “largest international survey of contemporary architecture in North America,” with participants including David Adjaye and Frank Gehry. (via ArchDaily)

The Palm Springs Art Museum has selected a new chair for its board of trustees: Donna MacMillan, the former vice chairman of acquisitions on the institution’s Contemporary Arts Council, and an avid collector and arts patron. She will work with executive director Elizabeth Armstrong and board president Dr. Jane Saltonstall, forming a “trifecta of influential women.” (via The Desert Sun)


Best of Instagram

Via @coolhunting: “The breathtaking soft cave conceived by @snarkitecture for @cosstores #MilanDesignWeek”

Via @guggenheim: “Final weeks! ‘#OnKawara—Silence’ closes May 3. Don’t miss the first comprehensive exhibition of Kawara’s practice, beginning in 1964 and including every category of work, much of it produced during his travels across the globe”

Via @manacontemporary: “‘I wanted to try and freeze that moment when something living begins to die,’—Zoë Buckman on preserving her placenta as a piece of art. Buckman is one of five new residents in the Mana Residency Program.”


Good Reads

National Gallery Hides Rembrandt Treasure—as it should(via artnet News)

Is Now the Bluest Time in Art?(via Hyperallergic)

True Confessions of a Justified Art Dealer, Part Five: Goodbye To All That(via ARTnews)

New Whitney and Broad Museum on trend with vast column-free space(via The Art Newspaper)


Want to catch up with the rest of this week’s news? Review past Daily Digests here.