March 31, 2015: Tate Britain Director Leaves to Run Lisbon Museum & Spain’s Only Michelangelo Restored 80 Years After Its Destruction

Opening


In New York …

Rad Light: The Radical Lighting Collection of Jim Walrod” opens at Patrick Parrish Gallery; “Amie Siegel: The Architects” opens at Storefront for Art and Architecture; “Pulse of Abstraction,” “East Meets West: An Exhibition of Fine Art from Asia,” and “Sensorial Perspectives” opens at Agora Gallery.


In Paris …

Gail Albert Halaban & Elene Usdin” opens at Galerie Esther Woerdehoff.


Today’s Notable News

Tate Britain director Penelope Curtis will leave her post to assume a new role as the first foreign director of Lisbon’s Museu Calouste Gulbenkian, whose diverse collection includes old masters paintings, Islamic art, and antiquities. Curtis will work with all the museum’s collections as well as strengthen its ties with the Centre de Arte Moderna. (via The Art Newspaper)

Spain’s only work by Michelangelo, a sculpture called Young Saint John the Baptist (1495-96), has finished undergoing 19 years of restoration—using old photographs, written descriptions, and 3D virtual modeling—after having been burnt and nearly irreparably hammered apart during the Spanish Civil War in the 1930s. The reconstructed sculpture, its original remains filled in with contemporary materials, goes on view at the Museo del Prado today. (via artnet News)

On the heels of its planned $75 million expansion, the Walker Art Center has promoted its senior curator and former SculptureCenter curator Fionn Meade to artistic director, as well as chosen Nisa Mackie—most recently public programs manager for the Biennale of Sydney—as its education and public programs director. (via ARTnews)

The San Antonio Museum of Art will be able to expand its exhibition space and educational programming, thanks to a donation of 3.5 acres of land, including a former operations building, from CPS Energy. (via San Antonio Business Journal)

Embroiled in conflict around plans to turn it into a luxury “art hotel,” Edinburgh’s historic, neoclassical Old Royal High School building—which was built in the 1820s and has lacked a consistent practical purpose for the past 50 years—may, if proposals pass, end up as an architectural museum or art gallery, with two new modernist wings. (via The Art Newspaper)

Former (and the first female) director of Australia’s National Gallery, Betty Churcher, has passed away at age 84. Nicknamed “Betty Blockbuster,” Churcher lined up top shows for the museum during her 1990–97 tenure, elevating the institution’s visitor popularity and cultural significance. (via artnet News)

Thea Westreich Art Advisory Services will be undergoing a change of ownership, as founder Thea Westreich Wagner and her husband Ethan Wagner will be giving over control of the firm to Suzanne Modica and Ashley Carr, in order to devote time to artist and museum patronage, such as their donation of 850 works to the Whitney and Centre Pompidou. (via Artforum)


Best of Instagram

Via @refinery29: “Murakami and @gagosiangallery has us hoping spring 2015 will be a bit more trippy. 🌸🌺 ”

Via @jackshainman: “#NickCaveTakesDetroit! Nick Cave’s ‘Here Hear’ will open @cranbrookartmuseum on June 20, but next month kicks off seven months of performances, special appearances and educational programming around #Detroit!”

Via @brooklynmuseum: “‘I had only to open my bedroom window, and blue air, love, and flowers entered with her.’ ... With a nip of spring in the air, there is no better time to gauge the power of Chagall’s palette than in his sensuous work now on view for the first time in the Museum. Find it on view in the Beaux-Arts Court.”


Good Reads

The Story Behind ‘Woman in Gold’: Nazi Art Thieves and One Painting’s Return(via the New York Times)

Syria Has Reputedly Hidden Away 99% of Its Cultural Heritage Artifacts(via Hyperallergic)

Tracey Emin’s Bed is now exactly where it belongs(via The Telegraph)


Artist of the Day

New York-based Dan Graham creates innovative installations often based on video performance, glass and mirrors structures, and photography. His pieces blur the line between art and architecture and reflect his interest in the interaction of people with art as commentary on today’s society. No surprise here that on this day of transition, when “March comes in like a lion and out like a lamb,” we celebrate Graham’s 73rd birthday.


Want to catch up with the rest of this week’s news? Review past Daily Digests here.

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