May 21, 2015: Hitler’s Horse Statues Turn Up in German Warehouse & Centre Pompidou Revisits Chinese Expansion

Opening


In New York …

Jonathan Nesci: Present Perimeter” opens at Patrick Parrish Gallery; “Jorge Tacla: Hidden Identities” opens at Cristin TierneyJung-woo Ha opens at Able Fine Art NY Gallery.


In Los Angeles …

Melanie Daniel: Piecemaker” opens at Shulamit Gallery.


In London …

Art15, with presentations by Gazelli Art House, Louise Alexander Gallery, and Sabrina Amrani, among others, opens at Olympia.


Photo London, with presentations by Ben Brown Fine Arts, Flowers, Edel AssantiTiwani ContemporaryVanessa Quang GalleryNailya Alexander GalleryPug Oslo, and Scheublein + Bak, among others, opens at Somerset House.

Andrzej Wróblewski, René Daniëls and Luc Tuymans: DE. FI. CIEN. CY” opens at Drawing Room; Nicolas Ceccaldi opens at Project Native Informant.


In Paris …

The Arrival of Spring” opens at Galerie Lelong; “De Minas à Bahia” opens at Galerie Agnès Monplaisir; “Babi Badalov: Art is Myth I am Real” opens at Galerie Jérôme Poggi.


In Hong Kong …

Peter Steinhauer – Surface Unseen” opens at Contemporary by Angela Li.


Today’s Notable News

In the course of a year-long German investigation into art trafficking on the black market, two bronze statues of horses that formerly adorned Hitler’s grand chancellery in Berlin have been discovered in a warehouse in Bad Duerkheim. A 16-by-33-foot granite relief was also found in the same location. The works had been unaccounted for since 1989, when they were exhibited in East Germany. (via The Telegraph)

The Centre Pompidou may be establishing pop-up branches in China, as president Serge Lasvignes has recently attended meetings with officials from the Asian country to discuss possible projects. The initiative responds to a number of gifts that the Parisian institution recently received from private Chinese collectors and, if accomplished, would complete its unsuccessful 2007 plans for a Chinese expansion. (via The Art Newspaper)

London’s Delfina Foundation, the city’s “largest international host and provider of international residencies,” will mount its first selling exhibition in October. “Then for Now,” whose earnings will go toward supporting young artists, will include donated works by Delfina’s “alumnae” of now-leading artists, including Chantal Joffe, Tacita Dean, and Jane and Louise Wilson. The exhibition, on view October 9th–November 14th, will be co-curated by Joffe. (via BLOUIN artinfo)

The Getty Trust has awarded its third annual J. Paul Getty Medal for visual art leadership to Frank Gehry. Gehry, who will receive a bronze medal at a private event on September 28th, is the first artist or designer to receive the honor. Getty president James Cuno has noted that although Gehry is an architect and not a visual artist, his career has focused on working closely with, and in service of, artists. (via the L.A. Times)

Art Basel and BMW have awarded the first BMW Art Journey for emerging artists to Hong Kong’s Samson Young, for his proposed piece For Whom the Bell Tolls: A Journey Into the Sonic History of Conflict. The award will give Young an “artistic journey around the globe” in the form of a tour of historic bells in countries and cities including Kenya, Australia, and Cologne, which he will use to create his work. (via BLOUIN artinfo)

The Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library of Emory University now owns Atlanta Contemporary Art Center’s collection of institutional papers, including exhibit catalogs, press releases, and exhibition and event photographs, along with other records and files from the institution. (via the Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

The Chrysler Museum’s McKinnon Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Amy L. Brandt, has passed away from ongoing health problems at the age of 37. Soon before her passing, Brandt organized the first major museum show dedicated to Chinese-American artist Tseng Kwong Chi, which opened at NYU’s Grey Gallery last month and will move to the Chrysler Museum this August. (via AltDaily)

The Copenhagen-born designer Jacob Jensen has passed away at the age of 89, following a quarter-century working relationship with Bang & Olufsen, during which he pioneered the company’s minimal look. Jensen’s style has been noted as combining elements of the Bauhaus with consumer-driven principles. (via Dezeen)


Best of Instagram

Via @guggenheim_venice: “‘Well, I have sympathy for abandoned objects, so I always try to rescue them as much as I can.’ – Robert Rauschenberg #TBT #throwbackthursday Installation view of #RobertRauschenberg’s exhibition ‘Gluts’ @guggenheim_venice, summer 2009 #peggyguggenheimcollection #venicebiennale #venice”


Via @museummammy: “#JennyHolzer


Via @art15london: “Look up - Trees by Manuel Felisi at Galleria Russo at @art15london #artfair #art15 #art #exhibition #london #trees”


Good Reads

Invitations are in the mail: Anne Pasternak outlines her welcoming vision for Brooklyn(via The Art Newspaper)

Why Are People So Afraid of Nude Performance Art?(via Hyperallegric)


Want to catch up with the rest of this week’s news? Review past Daily Digests here.