September 25, 2014: Frieze Appoints New Director, EU Proposes Cadmium Pigment Ban, and Mark Rothko’s Birthday

Opening

In New York… Ezra Johnson opens at Freight + Volume; Horst P. Horst opens at Staley-Wise Gallery; The New York Art Book Fair, presented by Printed Matter, opens this evening at MoMA PS1. 

In London… Horst P. Horst opens at Hamiltons Gallery.

Today’s Notable News

Victoria Siddal was appointed as the new director of Frieze London and Frieze New York (she is currently the director of Frieze Masters). She will take on the position starting with Frieze London 2015, and will be assisted by two new artistic directors, Jo Stella-Sawicka in London, and a New York-based director soon to be announced. 

The KW Institute for Contemporary Art has appointed DIS as the curatorial team for the 9th Berlin Biennale.  

The International Center of Photography announced it is moving to the Bowery after losing its rent-free location in Midtown. (via New York Times)

The National Gallery in London announced its will be launching a membership plan costing 50 pounds that will allow for free and unlimited entry to all paid-for exhibitions. (via The Guardian)

A ban on cadmium pigments used in acrylic, oil, and watercolor paints could be enforced across Europe within two years. Though highly toxic in its pure form, non-hazardous cadmium compounds are used by artists to produce bright yellows, oranges, and reds. (via Art Newspaper)

Best of Instagram

Via @maryboonegallery: “Jacob Hashimoto’s exhibition, “Skyfarm Fortress” is on view at 541 W 24th Street through 25 October.” 

Good Reads

Should children run wild in art galleries and museums?” Research suggests children learn best when they have the freedom to move about on their own. (via BBC Culture)

Wangechi Mutu: under the skin of Africa” (via The Guardian)

This Might Be Frank Gehry’s Craziest Building Yet” (via FastCo Design)

Artist of the Day

Mark Rothko, a pioneer of Color Field Painting, was born on this day in 1903. Rothko, an Abstract Expressionist, painted large canvases with expansive squares of color. His works evoke innate human emotions such as the sublime, anger, joy, elation, frustration, and doom. His works are intended to be observed in close proximity, allowing the canvases to surround the viewers. 

Want to catch up with the rest of this week’s news? Review past Daily Digests here