My Highlights: NADA Miami Beach, 2013

Lately I’ve been interested in artists that are slightly outside the mainstream: some self trained, others who have stayed out of the limelight. I’ve also been looking at a lot of work that comes directly from the hand of the artist. Some of the artists I selected I know, like Devon Dikeou, Aaron Angell, and Aramis Gutierrez. All are incredibly dedicated to their practices and follow threads that at times generate work that isn't readily embraced by the art market. I think that is an important statement about their work. And then some of the artists are completely new to me, and I’m reacting to the visual energy of the work, like Anna Betbeze and Joel Holmberg.  

Art fairs remain a place of research and development for us as collectors, and NADA creates that opportunity to find new artists better than any fair I know of. I always go around the corner of an aisle and come across someone I have never heard of but whose work I find compelling. I think the NADA fair’s real strength is the conceptual rigor that is present in so much of the work that is on display. It really is an early warning system for so many artists who you will see in art basel a couple years later.

Soshiro Matsubara, Purple fried eggs, 2013, at XYZ collective

Devon Dikeou, Clyfford Still Museum: 1 of 16 American Art Museums that Did Participate in the Artist’s Invitation to Collaborate, 2013, at Pay What You Wish, But You Must Pay Something

Joel Holmberg, Earlier Today, 2013, MARTOS GALLERY/Shoot the Lobster

Robert Moskowitz, Untitled, 2013, at Kerry Schuss

Aaron Angell, Dance for two bent halves, 2011, at House of Voltaire

Anna Betbeze, Morning Shower, 2013, at Kate Werbel Gallery

Daniel Subkoff, Garlands of Views, 2013, at James Fuentes LLC

Etel Adnan, Untitled, 2012, at Callicoon Fine Arts

Aramis Gutierrez, Happiness is Better Than Mirth, 2013, at Locust Projects

Explore NADA Miami Beach on Artsy and Artsy’s Editorial Highlights from the Miami Art Fairs.