Museum Shows/ May

Majestic African Textiles

Indianapolis Museum of Art

May 3rd 2013 – March 2nd 2014/ Indianapolis, IN USA

The Indianapolis Museum of Art presents Majestic African Textiles with an assortment of royal and prestige clothes, masking and ritual garments and beaded and embellished objects. The exhibition includes more than 60 pieces from the museum’s permanent collection alongside a few major loans. It features a group of richly patterned and elaborately decorated textiles from North and sub-Saharan Africa and is organized geographically to represent various African ethnic groups.

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PUNK: Chaos to Couture

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

May 9th – August 14th 2013/ New York, NY USA

The Met welcomes spring with a Costume Institute exhibition that examines punk’s impact on high fashion from the movement’s birth in the early 1970s through its influence today. It focuses on the relationship between the punk ‘do-it-yourself’ aesthetic and the couture concept of ‘made-to-measure’ through almost one hundred designs for men and women. The exhibition is centered around major themes in the seven galleries, including New York and London, Clothes for Heroes and four manifestations of the DIY aesthetic – Hardware, Bricolage, Graffiti and Agitprop and Destroy.

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Fritz Haeg: At Home in the City

Walker Art Center

May 11th – November 17th 2013/ Minneapolis, MN USA

Walker’s newest artist-in-residence is Fritz Haeg, who was trained as an architect but whose current work spans a range of disciplines including gardens, dance, performance, design, installation, ecology and architecture. Through a new series of projects, Haeg will work with the Twin Cities community on gardens, events and installations that contemplate our relationships with the land, the home, the city and each other.  The residency launches in May with Edible Estate #16, the last edition of Haeg’s initiative to replace suburban front lawns with highly visible productive gardens.

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Rain Room

Museum of Modern Art

May 12th – July 28th 2013/ New York, NY USA

The Rain Room comes to North America for the first time after being a feature of The Curve Gallery at the Barbican in London since last October.  Opening at the MoMA, Rain Room by rAndom International allows visitors to walk through the rain without getting wet as a clear path is navigated through the exhibition room. The sound of water and moisture fills the air before confronted by the downpour. rAndom International frequently has work at Design Miami/ through Carpenters Workshop Gallery.

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Design for the Modern Child

Philadelphia Museum of Art

May 25th – October 13th 2013/ Philadelphia, PA USA

Design for the Modern Child debuts several objects from Australia, Asia, Europe and Great Britain for the first time in the United States. It features the latest furniture, toys, tableware, wallpaper and textiles from all over the world along with classics from the museum’s design collection. The Cardboard Cubby House makes its premier, a towering playhouse designed by Australian architects Bennett and Trimble for the Skylit Atrium, allowing smaller visitors to learn and build for themselves from plans provided by the architects.

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A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living

Hammer Museum of Art

May 25th – September 8th 2013/ Los Angeles, CA USA

The Hammer Museum welcomes California’s own Archibald Quincy Jones with the first major museum retrospective of the Los Angeles-based architect’s work. Known as Quincy, he practiced architecture in Los Angeles from 1937 until 1979 and was a quiet modernist and professor at USC. His goals included bringing a higher standard of design to the middle class by reconsidering and refining postwar housing by emphasizing cost-effective, innovative and sustainable building methods. He is credited with more than 5,000 built projects, most of which still exist today.

-Brandon Grom

Design Miami/ Design Log