Andrew Schoultz

DRAW A LINE
Sep 9, 2014 3:29PM
In This Day And Age Art Should Serve A Purpose

Andrew Schoultz tells us he isn’t a very verbal person, but conversely we find he has a lot to say. He’s open and forward, reactive to his environment and is fond of ancient German map-making techniques Yes, we thought, this is going to be something very interesting.

We’d been in contact for a long while before the opportunity came up to meet with him in Berlin. Over a couple of warm May days we made his DRAW A LINE edition, showed him our favorite local graffiti spots and questioned him on his well-established career – something he modestly says he stumbled into. The Los Angeles-based artist is represented around the world by galleries like V1 Gallery in Copenhagen and Mark Moore Gallery in Los Angeles, and he creates a number of public murals every year in response to local issues.

If Schoultz thinks his verbal communication is lacking, then he certainly makes up for it in his works. To him, art performs its best when it challenges something that has already been accepted. His fantastical canvasses, installations and murals show repetitive themes of war, imperialism and socio-political hardships, telling us that even if history is a fate bound to repeat itself, you should always challenge the man.

Read the interview on our website...

DRAW A LINE
Get the Artsy app
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play
Jenna Gribbon, Luncheon on the grass, a recurring dream, 2020. Jenna Gribbon, April studio, parting glance, 2021. Jenna Gribbon, Silver Tongue, 2019