Alex Perweiler, Zachary Susskind, and the Future

Members of The Still House Group and frequent contributors to each other’s practice, Alex Perweiler and Zachary Susskind unveiled their first formal collaboration this month. On view at their Red Hook Studio, the show “Nobody comes here anymore, it’s too crowded” explores the tension between painting and sculpture through distillation of materials and ideas—a fitting convergence of the pair’s individual practices. Perweiler is known for his sculptures, paintings, and unprocessed photographic pieces, while Susskind often explores found and industrial materials. One of their works is included in the Whitney Art Party Sale, so we thought we’d take the opportunity to catch up with the duo.

Artsy: Who tried to talk you out of pursuing a career as an artist, and why did you persevere?

Alex Perweiler and Zachary Susskind: Most people we know, including ourselves. Being a part of a community of artists who work together to develop and improve through constant experimentation and dialogue is powerful motivation to continue.

Artsy: What tools are essential to your practice as an artist (anything from the Internet to paintbrushes to a particular Pandora station)?

AP/ZS: Pre-existing fixtures in and conditions of physical space, material that stands to have its intended purpose subverted to create gesture within it, and surface quality are essential to our independent and collaborative practices. Rubber, ink, oil, concrete, canvas, sandpaper, a good framer—these are all crucial for us to have at our disposal.

Artsy: You’re an exhibiting artist of the Whitney, who as you know, is soon to open a new location coined the “Whitney of the Future”. What does the future of art look like?

AP/ZS: Everything is going to look like art in the future.

Artsy: Who is your dream collector?

AP/ZS: Whoever feels that their life or the lives of others have the potential to be made more interesting because of thoughts, ideas, or feelings generated from an experience with the work.

Share article