Zarina: Paper Like Skin

Printmaker, sculptor, and all-around magician with paper Zarina has filled a wing of the Guggenheim Museum with the first ever retrospective of her work, spanning the 1960s to the present. A native of India, Zarina was displaced from her home at age ten upon the partition of India and Pakistan, never to permanently return; in her Diving Line woodcut, she represents this literal divide of a severed printing block. After years of migrancy, Zarina found a permanent home in New York in the mid ’70, but never to forget her easy to transport medium—paper. “Paper Like Skin” presents woodblock prints, lithographs, etchings, and sculptures cast in bronze or paper-pulp, often using handmade paper from Japan, Nepal, or her native home of India.

“Zarina: Paper Like Skin” is on view at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum through April 21, 2013.

Zarina, Crawling House, 1994, hand-cut and molded tin (set of 500 units from an edition of 1000 units), each unit: 12.7 x 6.4 x 5.1 cm, courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York; Untitled, 1970, relief print from collaged wood, printed in burnt umber on Indian handmade paper, 76.2 x 55.9 cm, edition 1/10, UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, purchased with funds provided by the Helga K. and Walter Oppenheimer Acquisition Fund, photo: Robert Wedemeyer; Dividing Line, 2001, woodcut printed in black on Indian handmade paper, mounted on Arches Cover white paper, 40.6 x 33 cm, image; 65.4 x 50.2 cm, sheet, edition 16/20, UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, purchased with funds provided by the Friends of the Graphic Arts, photo: Robert Wedemeyer; Installation view: Zarina: Paper Like Skin, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, January 25–April 21, 2013, photo: David Heald © 2012 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

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