Eugene Martin and André Breton

Eugene James Martin Estate
Jul 27, 2013 8:25PM

No matter a particular stylistic expression, Eugene Martin’s creations would always go beyond, always dig further, always burst out of their accepted boundaries.  When viewing Martin’s works in isolation, one may at first not understand the common thread that links his entire oeuvre.  But when one takes the time to look, to see, to understand, then the more one looks, the more one sees, the more one becomes convinced that Martin’s creations have a language all of their own. That he was a true original, a genius. That as an artist he did things one is not supposed to do. That he mixed, juxtaposed soft-edged and free-flowing organic forms alongside hard-edged geometric structures, all the while making both states intrinsically relate to and complement one another.  That Eugene Martin’s art was thus all about poetry.  Poetry in the metaphysical sense, the one that captures the essence of André Breton’s great text, the one in which "Everything leads to the belief that there exists a certain point of the mind at which life and death, the real and the imaginary, the past and the future, the communicable and the incommunicable, the high and the low, cease to be perceived as contradictions".  If one can sum up what Eugene Martin’s art was all about, it is about such poetry, so brilliantly expressed in the Second Manifesto of Surrealism.

Eugene James Martin Estate