About art, time and haptic

Gudberg Nerger
May 17, 2018 11:36AM


„How is it so true that anybody cannot easily save himself against his age!“ notes Johann Wolfgang Goethe in 1825 in a letter to his long-standing friend, the composer Carl Friedrich Zelter.[1] And if Goethe wold have known how wonderful things can be put in a nutshell by using hashtags, than his words would have been accentuated by #fastpace #richness #fastmoving...

Isabell Kamp: You and me is not you and me but you and me, 2016, Ceramics, metall, ca. 45 x 35 x 9 cm

„How is it so true that anybody cannot easily save himself against his age!“ notes Johann Wolfgang Goethe in 1825 in a letter to his long-standing friend, the composer Carl Friedrich Zelter.[1] And if Goethe wold have known how wonderful things can be put in a nutshell by using hashtags, than his words would have been accentuated by #fastpace #richness #fastmoving,  as in the same letter he states with foresight that especially the youth is too early excited and then teared away by the fast pace. And that the world would only admire richness and speed.

Nearly two centuries later Goethe is as relevant as never before: Instagram, Facebook, twitter et cetera show us images of a world, that is neither real nor constant. A world whose haptic is limited to the cold and crystalline surface of a smartphone or computer screen. Sensual qualities are scarce good, a deficit, that is particularly sensed and questioned by art.

So if you take your time and look around, there are quite interesting positions in art that separate themselves from this fast moving age, that have a longlasting workprocess and that live from their feel.

Isabel Kamp, who studied at the academy of fine arts in Stuttgart and is now living in hamburg, is an example for such a position. Her ceramics are sensual and time-consuming. The clay has to dry, then the glaze hast to be put on and at least there is always the fear that the sculpture could burst while the firing...

Isabell Kamp: Too much, too much III, 2018, Ceramics, ca. 20 x 7 cm

Astrid Ehlers, a former studend of professor Matt Mullican at the Academy of Fine Arts in Hamburg, works in the technique of dry point etching. Her work stand out by graphic mastery: in her etchings, whose process can last to one year, reflections of a subjective reality are formed by setting one accurate and concentrated line after the other. Especially things that seem to be trivial get into focus. The artist looks on them with a philosophical-phenomenological interest: what exactly do I see, how do I perceive it, what does it mean and what could it mean when we have a look on the whole connection between everything? So not even the art takes time but also reception needs it...

Astrid Ehlers: A needle scratches the surface: pole, 2017, drypoint on handmade paper, edition: 3 + 1, 56 x 78, detail.

Lukasz Chrobok, also an hamburg based artist who was assistant of Will McBride and Peter Reitberger, deals with the possibilities of the application of paint and the plasticitiy of the image. Cutted out faces expand the painting into space, the abstract forms get a three-dimensional presence that goes beyond the pure illusion. Time is needed for the precise cut-outs and haptic can be found in the sculpture-like image.

Lukasz Chrobok: Monokulare Tiefenkriterien, 2018, plastic, oil, wood on wood, 98 x 88 cm, detail.

Maren Schimmer studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Hamburg in the classes of Werner Büttner and Wiebke Siem. Her paintings arise from a longlasting processes of applied layers of coloured pencil, water colour and opaque white. The images play with the dimensions and perspective, tilting moments evoque dynamic image spaces, foreground and background get uncertain. What do we mean when we speak of space? Also these works need time to consume them...

Maren Schimmer: weilwiee, 2017, coloured pencil, water colour and opaque white on paperboard, 70 x 50 cm, detail.

Jenni Tietze, also a graduate of the Academy of Fine Arts Hamburg, works with acribic cut-outs. Collages are combined by colour or patterns, filigree structures are cutted in and new contexts grow out. The cut-outs fascinate by their enourmously richness of details.

Jenni Tietze: Iced-Sea, 2017, collage and cut-out on paper, 29,7 x 41,8 cm.

Nike Schröder, born in Hamburg and now living in Los Angeles, California, draws in her textile works with the needle and yarn, creating artworks of sensual beauty. Time can be seen in every stitch. The figurative embroideries speak of moments, that could be taken of the familiy photo album: a group portrait, a single portrait, parents that are laughing into the camera. At the one hand the artworks are narrative, at the other hand they are open because of the loose threads - the narrative thread can be spun on by the viewer

Nike Schroeder
Fundamental reports #09, 2012
Gudberg Nerger

The exhibition #WelcomeToTheRealWorld, bringing the six artists together, is on display at GUDBERG NERGER till 30th may 2018.

Gudberg Nerger