About the Installation: Fired but Unexploded

Hungarian Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale
May 22, 2013 7:40PM

Fired but unexploded is made up of 20 videos, each presenting an unexploded projectile found in Hungary. The vision of the destructive weapons, which hover in a homogeneous, indefinite space, is complemented with the sounds of the world around them, and thus the films open the way to new narratives.

For the 55th International Art Exhibition in Venice, Zsolt Asztalos created the story of the malfunctioning device which stays with us, generating, interpreting and symbolizing conflicts among humans. His “found objects” are multiple representations of conflict situations, open to simultaneous interpretations on personal, local, regional and global levels.

An unexploded bomb makes a statement. It thinks. Motionless. Mathematically. The process frozen by chance devours time. They are manifestations of a state of grace. The machine that was created to destroy man left its original function, and went on (may go on) to write the history of humanity on its own, creating personal myths and narratives which may make the inexplicable, if not interpretable, at least relatable. It is with its own disorders that technicized society creates an opportunity for mystery to work—while denying its very existence. Their faulty or “unnatural” behavior extends the temporal dimensions of the conflicts, even reveal them as timeless.

Fired but unexploded, 2011, Audio: Atmosphere of forest, Video 4 min loop.

Images:  Zsolt Asztalos,  Fired but Unexploded, © Zsolt Asztalos

Hungarian Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale
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