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Friday Wrap-Up: This Week in ArtsEd

Make sure to read this week’s engaging spotlight on the digital-first mindset of 21st century museums from the New York Times. Steve Lohr describes the visitor-focused technology that will be unveiled when the Cooper Hewitt reopens in December. The article also covers Art++, an impressively innovative research project that is building an image-recognition app that will allow users to scan a museum artwork with a smartphone and see a “digital halo” of information surrounding the work.

A recent conversation between Sarah Hromack, Director of Digital Media at the Whitney, and designer/educator Rob Giampietro in the October issue of Art in America also takes up questions of online and digital experiences of art. The two tackle some of the longstanding debates around the arts and tech intersection, such as differences between the in-person and the online experience, as well as some more of-the-moment questions, like the impact of Instagram, Vine, and even Google Street View on how we encounter works of art like Kara Walker’s recent installation at the Domino Sugar Factory.

Check out the Queens Museum’s weekly #EduTues Hashtag meet-up. Every Tuesday, the museum partners with an education thought leader and poses a question to the arts education Twitter audience—for example, How do museums reach multilingual audiences? or, How should teachers and arts organization collaborate on curriculum? This week’s topic: How can we be culturally responsive to hybrid identities?

The Queens Museum has long been recognized for their dedicated and inventive educational programming. This morning the museum officially announced that all New York City Department of Education employees can now enjoy free admission.

We’re happy to see The Art Genome Project mentioned in yesterday’s Center for the Future of Museums blog post (an initiative of the American Alliance of Museums) by their director Elizabeth Merrit! Merritt highlighted The Art Genome Project’s recommendations based on mapping the characteristics of  artworks and artists as an innovative example of personalized culture. Thanks!

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