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Adriana Salazar

Colombian, b. 1980

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Adriana Salazar

Colombian, b. 1980

Biography

Adriana Salazar builds kinetic sculptures that perform simple human actions, such as tying a pair of shoelaces, threading a needle, or smoking a cigarette. By mimicking some of humanity’s most mundane and unconscious acts—measuring a wall or switching a light on and off—Salazar seeks to decontextualize them, rendering them meaningless and futile, to humorous effect. “It is fascinating…to see, as in a distorted mirror in front of us, what we do, but without our presence,” she says. “Just the action repeating itself over and over.” Salazar’s mechanisms perform their given tasks clumsily, suggesting the absurdity of machines replacing humans in the most basic of tasks and their ultimate failure to do so.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Biography

Adriana Salazar builds kinetic sculptures that perform simple human actions, such as tying a pair of shoelaces, threading a needle, or smoking a cigarette. By mimicking some of humanity’s most mundane and unconscious acts—measuring a wall or switching a light on and off—Salazar seeks to decontextualize them, rendering them meaningless and futile, to humorous effect. “It is fascinating…to see, as in a distorted mirror in front of us, what we do, but without our presence,” she says. “Just the action repeating itself over and over.” Salazar’s mechanisms perform their given tasks clumsily, suggesting the absurdity of machines replacing humans in the most basic of tasks and their ultimate failure to do so.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)