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Andy Diaz Hope

American, b. 1967

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Andy Diaz Hope

American, b. 1967

Biography

Andy Diaz Hope is known for mixed-media installations and fantastical sculptures where intricate patterns and light systems draw on Diaz Hope’s engineering background. Peering though peepholes into the six-foot black aluminum sphere of his Infinite Mortal (2009), for example, reveals a mirrored, colorful labyrinth of illuminated spinning Jesus images; like many of his works, it contemplates existence and mortality with a touch of humor. Diaz Hope has also created series of photographs, portraits, and videos examining the darker facets of society, such as drug culture and terrorism-fueled fear of our neighbors. In his deconstructed “Morning After Portraits” (2003-08)—made from individual capsules that read as complete images from afar—people suffering from hangovers turn to their medicine cabinets and local pharmacies for relief. The series “looks behind the mirror to expose the inner workings of our medicine cabinets and our relationship to them as our doctor, psychologist, cosmetician, and spiritual healer,” he explains.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Group
Group show at a major institution
National Gallery of Victoria
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)
Biography

Andy Diaz Hope is known for mixed-media installations and fantastical sculptures where intricate patterns and light systems draw on Diaz Hope’s engineering background. Peering though peepholes into the six-foot black aluminum sphere of his Infinite Mortal (2009), for example, reveals a mirrored, colorful labyrinth of illuminated spinning Jesus images; like many of his works, it contemplates existence and mortality with a touch of humor. Diaz Hope has also created series of photographs, portraits, and videos examining the darker facets of society, such as drug culture and terrorism-fueled fear of our neighbors. In his deconstructed “Morning After Portraits” (2003-08)—made from individual capsules that read as complete images from afar—people suffering from hangovers turn to their medicine cabinets and local pharmacies for relief. The series “looks behind the mirror to expose the inner workings of our medicine cabinets and our relationship to them as our doctor, psychologist, cosmetician, and spiritual healer,” he explains.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Group
Group show at a major institution
National Gallery of Victoria
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)