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Beth Ames Swartz

American, b. 1936

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Beth Ames Swartz

American, b. 1936

64
Followers
Biography

Beth Ames Swartz’s early series of abstract paintings strove to create a contemplative atmosphere in the manner of the Rothko Chapel, depicting the seven chakras (points along the spine through which energy flows, according to Hindu and Buddhist tradition). Subsequent mixed-media series, ranging from pure abstraction to semi-representational landscapes, centered around the concepts of order, disorder, and reordering. In “Visible Reminders” (2001-02), an acrylic series named after a line of poetry by T.S. Eliot, seemingly random vertical drips and horizontal bands of color contain a grid of hidden words. Incorporating symbols shared across cultures, Swartz’s body of work reflects a belief in universal interconnectedness, inspired by Kabbalah, Native American healing practices, and various other philosophies. “I propose not a duality of life and death, but an endless cycle of life, death, and rebirth,” she says.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum
Biography

Beth Ames Swartz’s early series of abstract paintings strove to create a contemplative atmosphere in the manner of the Rothko Chapel, depicting the seven chakras (points along the spine through which energy flows, according to Hindu and Buddhist tradition). Subsequent mixed-media series, ranging from pure abstraction to semi-representational landscapes, centered around the concepts of order, disorder, and reordering. In “Visible Reminders” (2001-02), an acrylic series named after a line of poetry by T.S. Eliot, seemingly random vertical drips and horizontal bands of color contain a grid of hidden words. Incorporating symbols shared across cultures, Swartz’s body of work reflects a belief in universal interconnectedness, inspired by Kabbalah, Native American healing practices, and various other philosophies. “I propose not a duality of life and death, but an endless cycle of life, death, and rebirth,” she says.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum