Dorothea Lange

American, 1895–1965

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Dorothea Lange

American, 1895–1965

1,947
Followers
Biography

Dorothea Lange spent her life documenting humanity through her revealing, empathetic photographs of the lives of others. An early case of polio brought a permanent handicap in one of her limbs; also having survived childhood abandonment by her father, Lange was strong and deeply compassionate. Upon the arrival of the Great Depression in the 1930s, she used photography to share the image of those affected by hunger and unemployment. Her best known work, Migrant Mother (1936), was taken while working to document the farm families forced to migrate west in search of work. The photo depicts the severity of the Depression, humanized by Lange's composition of an impoverished woman and her children. Lange is also known for exposing the racism and human rights issues of the WWII Japanese-American internment through her images (which were censored) and as the later co-founder of Aperture Magazine.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Established
Established representation
Represented by industry leading galleries.
User
Solo show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 2 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 6 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Tate, and 4 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
frieze, and 1 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale International Exhibition, and 1 more
Biography

Dorothea Lange spent her life documenting humanity through her revealing, empathetic photographs of the lives of others. An early case of polio brought a permanent handicap in one of her limbs; also having survived childhood abandonment by her father, Lange was strong and deeply compassionate. Upon the arrival of the Great Depression in the 1930s, she used photography to share the image of those affected by hunger and unemployment. Her best known work, Migrant Mother (1936), was taken while working to document the farm families forced to migrate west in search of work. The photo depicts the severity of the Depression, humanized by Lange's composition of an impoverished woman and her children. Lange is also known for exposing the racism and human rights issues of the WWII Japanese-American internment through her images (which were censored) and as the later co-founder of Aperture Magazine.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Established
Established representation
Represented by industry leading galleries.
User
Solo show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 2 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 6 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Tate, and 4 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
frieze, and 1 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale International Exhibition, and 1 more
Articles Featuring Dorothea Lange
Dorothea Lange’s 5 Most Iconic Images
Jan 6th, 2020
Haunting Photos from Japanese Internment Camps Show the Human Cost of Fear
Jan 26th, 2018
Why Do Certain Photographs Make History?
Jan 24th, 2018
The Fateful Roadside Stop That Led to Dorothea Lange’s “Migrant Mother”
Jan 12th, 2018
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