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Gilbert and George

British, 1943 and 1942

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Gilbert and George

British, 1943 and 1942

1,870
Followers
Auction results
Filter auction results to compare past lots by medium, size, and more. Note that auction prices vary based on market specifics at the time of the auction and may not be indicative of the current gallery market. To get the best sense of value, pair the artist’s auction results with their career highlights like exhibition history, gallery representation, and presence in museum collections. For more information on how auction pricing differs from gallery pricing, check out this article.
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Showing 21 results
Showing 21 results
No artwork image
Price not available
KILLER
Sold on Jun 27, 2018
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Artwork Info
Painting
mixed media, in 28 parts
302 by 444 cm
Realized Price
Price not available
Auction Sale
Jun 27, 2018
Sotheby's
Description
signed, titled and dated 2011 mixed media, in 28 parts overall: 302 by 444 cm. 118 7/8 by 174 7/8 in.
No artwork image
KILLER
mixed media, in 28 parts
Jun 27, 2018
Sotheby's
Price not available
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Artwork Info
Painting
302 by 444 cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
Jun 27, 2018
Sotheby's
Realized Price
Price not available
Description
signed, titled and dated 2011 mixed media, in 28 parts overall: 302 by 444 cm. 118 7/8 by 174 7/8 in.
No artwork image
Price not available
THUGS
Sold on Jun 27, 2018
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Artwork Info
Video/Film/Animation
mixed media, in four parts
153.1 by 127 cm
Realized Price
Price not available
Auction Sale
Jun 27, 2018
Sotheby's
Description
signed, titled and dated 2011 mixed media, in four parts overall: 153.1 by 127 cm. 59 1/2 by 50 in.
No artwork image
THUGS
mixed media, in four parts
Jun 27, 2018
Sotheby's
Price not available
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Artwork Info
Video/Film/Animation
153.1 by 127 cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
Jun 27, 2018
Sotheby's
Realized Price
Price not available
Description
signed, titled and dated 2011 mixed media, in four parts overall: 153.1 by 127 cm. 59 1/2 by 50 in.
No artwork image
$150,000
THIRTY-FIVE LOCATIONS
Sold on May 17, 2018
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Artwork Info
Photography
hand dyed gelatin silver prints, in 24 parts
361.3 by 422.9 cm
Realized Price
$150,000
Auction Sale
May 17, 2018
Sotheby's
Description
hand dyed gelatin silver prints, in 24 parts 132 1/4 by 166 1/2 in. 361.3 by 422.9 cm. Executed in 2003.
No artwork image
THIRTY-FIVE LOCATIONS
hand dyed gelatin silver prints, in 24 parts
May 17, 2018
Sotheby's
$150,000
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Photography
361.3 by 422.9 cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
May 17, 2018
Sotheby's
Realized Price
$150,000
Description
hand dyed gelatin silver prints, in 24 parts 132 1/4 by 166 1/2 in. 361.3 by 422.9 cm. Executed in 2003.
£200,000
Sold on Sep 13, 2017
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Artwork Info
Photography
hand-dyed gelatin silver prints, in artist's frames, in 28 parts
Realized Price
£200,000
Auction Sale
Sep 13, 2017
Sotheby's
Description
"The grids are a natural part of making large photo-pieces. It is like a week has to be divided into day, for convenience. A house has to be made of bricks. You can’t make a house from one big brick. You cannot make a skyscraper with one enormous sheet of glass. Everything is in sections” (George cited in: Gilbert & George, Gilbert & George: The Complete Pictures 1971-1985, London 1997, p. 153).
hand-dyed gelatin silver prints, in artist's frames, in 28 parts
Sep 13, 2017
Sotheby's
£200,000
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Photography
Estimate
Auction Sale
Sep 13, 2017
Sotheby's
Realized Price
£200,000
Description
"The grids are a natural part of making large photo-pieces. It is like a week has to be divided into day, for convenience. A house has to be made of bricks. You can’t make a house from one big brick. You cannot make a skyscraper with one enormous sheet of glass. Everything is in sections” (George cited in: Gilbert & George, Gilbert & George: The Complete Pictures 1971-1985, London 1997, p. 153).
£1,148,750
Sold on Mar 8, 2017
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Artwork Info
Photography
hand-dyed gelatin silver prints in artists' frames, in 16 parts
Realized Price
£1,148,750
Auction Sale
Mar 8, 2017
Sotheby's
Description
Marking a pivotal and transformative moment in the career of Gilbert and George, Shag Stiff is a monumental work from the artists’ definitive Dirty Words Pictures. Each meticulously apportioned in the artists’ signature manner into sleek minimalist grids, the Dirty Words Pictures are a tour de force of Gilbert and George’s praxis, indeed, many works from the series are held in prestigious museum collections such Cunt Scum in Tate, London; Angry in Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo; Are You Angry Or Are You Boring? in Stedelijk Van Abbesmuseum, Eindhoven; Cunt in Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Fuck in Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg; Queer in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam; Smash in Arts Council Collection, London and Suck in San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Remarkable for its intensity of vision, this extraordinary body of work consolidates and advances the compositional grammar wrought by the artists’ preceding piece, Red Morning, to create the cornerstone of their inimitable style – a style that has influenced a whole generation of artists. Emblazoned across the present work’s lintel, scratched into a stone wall, is the word ‘Shag’ which  is split into four single frames: “by putting the word along the top, then something vertical down both sides, it looked like a door. A door of hell. We found much of the graffiti in doorways... We became interested to know what makes a person do that” (Gilbert and George cited in: Carter Ratcliff, Gilbert and George: The Complete Pictures 1971-1985, London 1986, p. XXVII).  Further down the composition, across two frames is the word ‘Stiff’, which acts as a halo above two photographs of the artists. These obscene proclamations assume a twofold role in this series becoming both the source and title of the Dirty Word Pictures. Executed in 1977, a year of political and social unrest in England, Shag Stiff points to the acceleration in social and cultural disaffection that was in part born of the anti-establishment punk rock movement that gained momentum in the same year. Stripping back romantic notions of the city, Shag Stiff is infused with the vital sheen of contemporaneity, a timeless appeal that still thoroughly engages with our own modern day society. Speaking of this moment Gilbert recalls, “England was so run down in 1975, 1976, 1977, it was totally anarchic, with big piles of rubbish lying in Leicester Square, with super-flies and super-rats…” while George added, “Continental people saw England as a big pile of shit with a punk rock waving a swastika on top of it” (Gilbert and George cited in: Michael Bracewell, ‘Writing the Modern World’ in: Exh. Cat., London, Serpentine Gallery, Gilbert and George: Dirty Words Pictures, 2002, p. 15). The present work is flanked on each side by two columns of red photographs that depict steel drum players and punctuated in the middle by two black and white images of a modernist office block. As with other works in this series, these images are derived from the artists’ East London environs. Having introduced red into their oeuvre for the first time in 1974, the intense red inventions in the Dirty Word Pictures series come to evocatively accentuate the potency of the surrounding black and white images. As George elaborated, "We were looking for a more aggressive, more powerful image. Red has more strength than black. Black and white is powerful but red on top of it is even more so. It's louder" (George cited in: Carter Ratcliff, op. cit., p. XXIII). The overwhelming scope and ambition achieved in Shag Stiff, and the Dirty Word Pictures as a wider whole, demonstrates a new level of compositional rigour that is self-consciously transgressive, cementing aesthetic order from the chaos and conflict the artists experienced around them. The regular grid structure that was introduced in earnest in Cherry Blossom, 1974, has been tightened in the present work by eliminating the gaps between each component of the grid to give a more coherent, vital work that assumes a mural-like quality. The unifying architectonic structure of the grid takes on a double function and intriguingly also serves to break up the pictorial field, highlighting Gilbert and George’s central preoccupation with the fractured nature of the city. In doing so, the notion of the city that Gilbert and George present in Shag Stiff is not a real one, but a mental conception of the metropolis as a duality where the crowd is at once an anonymous throng and a mass of highly individualised figures. As the artists themselves have said: “to walk the streets of London is to walk the streets of the world” (Gilbert and George cited in: Lisa Corrin, ‘Are you angry or are you boring?’, in: op. cit., 2003, p. 31).
hand-dyed gelatin silver prints in artists' frames, in 16 parts
Mar 8, 2017
Sotheby's
£1,148,750
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Photography
Estimate
Auction Sale
Mar 8, 2017
Sotheby's
Realized Price
£1,148,750
Description
Marking a pivotal and transformative moment in the career of Gilbert and George, Shag Stiff is a monumental work from the artists’ definitive Dirty Words Pictures. Each meticulously apportioned in the artists’ signature manner into sleek minimalist grids, the Dirty Words Pictures are a tour de force of Gilbert and George’s praxis, indeed, many works from the series are held in prestigious museum collections such Cunt Scum in Tate, London; Angry in Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo; Are You Angry Or Are You Boring? in Stedelijk Van Abbesmuseum, Eindhoven; Cunt in Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; Fuck in Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg; Queer in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam; Smash in Arts Council Collection, London and Suck in San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Remarkable for its intensity of vision, this extraordinary body of work consolidates and advances the compositional grammar wrought by the artists’ preceding piece, Red Morning, to create the cornerstone of their inimitable style – a style that has influenced a whole generation of artists. Emblazoned across the present work’s lintel, scratched into a stone wall, is the word ‘Shag’ which  is split into four single frames: “by putting the word along the top, then something vertical down both sides, it looked like a door. A door of hell. We found much of the graffiti in doorways... We became interested to know what makes a person do that” (Gilbert and George cited in: Carter Ratcliff, Gilbert and George: The Complete Pictures 1971-1985, London 1986, p. XXVII).  Further down the composition, across two frames is the word ‘Stiff’, which acts as a halo above two photographs of the artists. These obscene proclamations assume a twofold role in this series becoming both the source and title of the Dirty Word Pictures. Executed in 1977, a year of political and social unrest in England, Shag Stiff points to the acceleration in social and cultural disaffection that was in part born of the anti-establishment punk rock movement that gained momentum in the same year. Stripping back romantic notions of the city, Shag Stiff is infused with the vital sheen of contemporaneity, a timeless appeal that still thoroughly engages with our own modern day society. Speaking of this moment Gilbert recalls, “England was so run down in 1975, 1976, 1977, it was totally anarchic, with big piles of rubbish lying in Leicester Square, with super-flies and super-rats…” while George added, “Continental people saw England as a big pile of shit with a punk rock waving a swastika on top of it” (Gilbert and George cited in: Michael Bracewell, ‘Writing the Modern World’ in: Exh. Cat., London, Serpentine Gallery, Gilbert and George: Dirty Words Pictures, 2002, p. 15). The present work is flanked on each side by two columns of red photographs that depict steel drum players and punctuated in the middle by two black and white images of a modernist office block. As with other works in this series, these images are derived from the artists’ East London environs. Having introduced red into their oeuvre for the first time in 1974, the intense red inventions in the Dirty Word Pictures series come to evocatively accentuate the potency of the surrounding black and white images. As George elaborated, "We were looking for a more aggressive, more powerful image. Red has more strength than black. Black and white is powerful but red on top of it is even more so. It's louder" (George cited in: Carter Ratcliff, op. cit., p. XXIII). The overwhelming scope and ambition achieved in Shag Stiff, and the Dirty Word Pictures as a wider whole, demonstrates a new level of compositional rigour that is self-consciously transgressive, cementing aesthetic order from the chaos and conflict the artists experienced around them. The regular grid structure that was introduced in earnest in Cherry Blossom, 1974, has been tightened in the present work by eliminating the gaps between each component of the grid to give a more coherent, vital work that assumes a mural-like quality. The unifying architectonic structure of the grid takes on a double function and intriguingly also serves to break up the pictorial field, highlighting Gilbert and George’s central preoccupation with the fractured nature of the city. In doing so, the notion of the city that Gilbert and George present in Shag Stiff is not a real one, but a mental conception of the metropolis as a duality where the crowd is at once an anonymous throng and a mass of highly individualised figures. As the artists themselves have said: “to walk the streets of London is to walk the streets of the world” (Gilbert and George cited in: Lisa Corrin, ‘Are you angry or are you boring?’, in: op. cit., 2003, p. 31).
£250
Dirty Words Pictures FUCK, 2002
Sold on May 18, 2016
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Artwork Info
Photography
inkjet printed poster, unframed
99 x 69.2 cm
Realized Price
£250
Auction Sale
May 18, 2016
Christie's
Description
Gilbert and George (San Martin de Tor b. 1943 and Plymouth b. 1942) Dirty Words Pictures FUCK signed 'Gilbert and George' (along the lower edge) inkjet printed poster, unframed 39 x 27 1/4 in. (99 x 69.2 cm.) Poster for the _The Dirty Words Pictures_ exhibition, July 2002, Serpentine Gallery, London.
Dirty Words Pictures FUCK, 2002
inkjet printed poster, unframed
May 18, 2016
Christie's
£250
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Photography
99 x 69.2 cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
May 18, 2016
Christie's
Realized Price
£250
Description
Gilbert and George (San Martin de Tor b. 1943 and Plymouth b. 1942) Dirty Words Pictures FUCK signed 'Gilbert and George' (along the lower edge) inkjet printed poster, unframed 39 x 27 1/4 in. (99 x 69.2 cm.) Poster for the _The Dirty Words Pictures_ exhibition, July 2002, Serpentine Gallery, London.
No artwork image
$75,000
TREED
Sold on Sep 24, 2014
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Artwork Info
Photography
hand-dyed photographs mounted on board, in 4 parts
169 by 142 cm
Realized Price
$75,000
Auction Sale
Sep 24, 2014
Sotheby's
Description
signed, titled and dated 1992 on one element hand-dyed photographs mounted on board, in 4 parts Overall: 66 1/2 by 56 in. 169 by 142 cm.
No artwork image
TREED
hand-dyed photographs mounted on board, in 4 parts
Sep 24, 2014
Sotheby's
$75,000
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Photography
169 by 142 cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
Sep 24, 2014
Sotheby's
Realized Price
$75,000
Description
signed, titled and dated 1992 on one element hand-dyed photographs mounted on board, in 4 parts Overall: 66 1/2 by 56 in. 169 by 142 cm.
$75,000
Sold on Sep 24, 2014
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Artwork Info
Realized Price
$75,000
Auction Sale
Sep 24, 2014
Sotheby's
Description
Sep 24, 2014
Sotheby's
$75,000
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Estimate
Auction Sale
Sep 24, 2014
Sotheby's
Realized Price
$75,000
No artwork image
£25,000
THE RED SCULPTURE ALBUM
Sold on Feb 16, 2012
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Artwork Info
Print
signed and numbered 50/100 on the inside front page
50.8 by 3.3cm
Realized Price
£25,000
Auction Sale
Feb 16, 2012
Sotheby's
Description
signed and numbered 50/100 on the inside front page eleven bound colour photographs each image: 30.3 by 38cm.; 12 by 15in. overall: 39 by 50.8 by 3.3cm.; 15 3/8 by 20 by 1 3/8 in. Executed in 1975.
No artwork image
THE RED SCULPTURE ALBUM
signed and numbered 50/100 on the inside front page
Feb 16, 2012
Sotheby's
£25,000
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Print
50.8 by 3.3cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
Feb 16, 2012
Sotheby's
Realized Price
£25,000
Description
signed and numbered 50/100 on the inside front page eleven bound colour photographs each image: 30.3 by 38cm.; 12 by 15in. overall: 39 by 50.8 by 3.3cm.; 15 3/8 by 20 by 1 3/8 in. Executed in 1975.
No artwork image
£8,750
PARLIAMENT WINDOW
Sold on Feb 16, 2012
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Artwork Info
Work on Paper
postcard collage laid on board
239 by 179cm
Realized Price
£8,750
Auction Sale
Feb 16, 2012
Sotheby's
Description
signed postcard collage laid on board image: 202 by 158cm.; 79 1/2 by 62 1/4 in. sheet: 239 by 179cm.; 94 1/8 by 70 1/2 in. Executed in 1989.
No artwork image
PARLIAMENT WINDOW
postcard collage laid on board
Feb 16, 2012
Sotheby's
£8,750
Realized price
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Artwork Info
Work on Paper
239 by 179cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
Feb 16, 2012
Sotheby's
Realized Price
£8,750
Description
signed postcard collage laid on board image: 202 by 158cm.; 79 1/2 by 62 1/4 in. sheet: 239 by 179cm.; 94 1/8 by 70 1/2 in. Executed in 1989.
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