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Isa Genzken

German, b. 1948

1.6k followers

Isa Genzken

Bio

German, b. 1948

Followers
1.6k
Biography

Using insubstantial commercial materials to depict what seems indestructible, Isa Genzken’s sculptures explore the tension between permanence and transience. Drawing on the legacies of Constructivism and Minimalism and often involving a critical dialogue with Modernist architecture, Genzken’s works comment on the way we build and destroy our environments, which are an expression of hope as well as a monument to our consumption and destructiveness. Following 9/11, Genzken created a series entitled “Empire/Vampire, Who Kills Death” (2002–03), using her characteristic assortment of disposable materials such as plastic vessels, toy figures, and other detritus to depict scenes of post-apocalyptic devastation and confusion. For her installation Oil, the artist transformed the German Pavilion at the 2007 Venice Biennale into a saturnine and futuristic Gesamtkunstwerk (the German word for “total art-work”).

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Blue chip status
Blue chip representation
Represented by internationally reputable galleries.
User
Solo show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 8 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 21 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Tate, and 2 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 6 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale National Pavilion, and 5 more
Biography

Using insubstantial commercial materials to depict what seems indestructible, Isa Genzken’s sculptures explore the tension between permanence and transience. Drawing on the legacies of Constructivism and Minimalism and often involving a critical dialogue with Modernist architecture, Genzken’s works comment on the way we build and destroy our environments, which are an expression of hope as well as a monument to our consumption and destructiveness. Following 9/11, Genzken created a series entitled “Empire/Vampire, Who Kills Death” (2002–03), using her characteristic assortment of disposable materials such as plastic vessels, toy figures, and other detritus to depict scenes of post-apocalyptic devastation and confusion. For her installation Oil, the artist transformed the German Pavilion at the 2007 Venice Biennale into a saturnine and futuristic Gesamtkunstwerk (the German word for “total art-work”).

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Blue chip status
Blue chip representation
Represented by internationally reputable galleries.
User
Solo show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 8 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 21 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Tate, and 2 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 6 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale National Pavilion, and 5 more
Shows Featuring Isa Genzken
Articles Featuring Isa Genzken
The 15 Best Booths at Frieze London and Frieze Masters
Oct 3rd, 2019
The 15 Best Booths at Frieze London and Frieze Masters
How Nefertiti Became a Powerful Symbol in Contemporary Art
Feb 16th, 2019
How Nefertiti Became a Powerful Symbol in Contemporary Art
Why Artists Are Using Dolls to Create Feminist Art
Sep 26th, 2017
Why Artists Are Using Dolls to Create Feminist Art
What Art Can Teach Us That a Newspaper Can’t
Dec 22nd, 2015
What Art Can Teach Us That a Newspaper Can’t
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