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Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

French, 1780–1867

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Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

French, 1780–1867

1,064
Followers
Biography

Studying under Jacques-Louis David for four years, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres developed a Neoclassical approach that changed little as his career unfolded. Known for his extraordinary drawing skills, Ingres believed that line, not color, conveyed the expressive content in an image. He did not share his colleagues’ enthusiasm for battle scenes, preferring to depict revelatory moments and intimate confrontations that rarely included movement or violence, and his early work was criticized for stylistic and historical idiosyncrasies. Ingres despised the more fashionable work of the Romantics such as Eugene Delacroix, and was despondent when his work was poorly received in the Salons. Inspired by Orientalism, Ingres painted a series of odalisques that were originally panned for their exaggerated anatomy and depiction of odd accessories, but were later hailed as Romantic masterpieces.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Auction
High auction record
€2m, Christie's, 2009
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 4 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and 2 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
The Guardian
Biography

Studying under Jacques-Louis David for four years, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres developed a Neoclassical approach that changed little as his career unfolded. Known for his extraordinary drawing skills, Ingres believed that line, not color, conveyed the expressive content in an image. He did not share his colleagues’ enthusiasm for battle scenes, preferring to depict revelatory moments and intimate confrontations that rarely included movement or violence, and his early work was criticized for stylistic and historical idiosyncrasies. Ingres despised the more fashionable work of the Romantics such as Eugene Delacroix, and was despondent when his work was poorly received in the Salons. Inspired by Orientalism, Ingres painted a series of odalisques that were originally panned for their exaggerated anatomy and depiction of odd accessories, but were later hailed as Romantic masterpieces.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Auction
High auction record
€2m, Christie's, 2009
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 4 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and 2 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
The Guardian
Articles Featuring Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres
Body Issues: The Pleasures of Painting Skin
Feb 20th, 2020
Body Issues: The Pleasures of Painting Skin
The Invention of Photography Emboldened Artists to Portray Overt Sexuality
Mar 18th, 2019
The Invention of Photography Emboldened Artists to Portray Overt Sexuality
What Secrets Do These Sketches Reveal about 8 Iconic Artworks?
Apr 19th, 2016
What Secrets Do These Sketches Reveal about 8 Iconic Artworks?
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