José Clemente Orozco

Mexican, 1883–1949

1.2k followers

José Clemente Orozco

Bio

Mexican, 1883–1949

Followers
1.2k
Biography

Alongside Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros, José Clemente Orozco was one of the major muralists of the Mexican Revolution. In spite of losing his left hand and sight in one eye, Orozco persisted in his artistic career, though not without a biting sense of humor and critical eye. Like Rivera and Siqueiros, Orozco studied at the San Carlos Academy for Fine Arts in Mexico City, and painted everyday subjects in a realist style. He studied with Gerardo Murillo, a radical who encouraged his students to reject European influences and embrace Mexican traditions. Bolstered by this, Orozco became increasingly involved with social and political activism through his art. He made easel paintings and caricatures for a radical paper, but his public works would become his greatest legacy—grand murals throughout North America, depicting allegorical scenes of history, uprising, industry, and suffering.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
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Solo show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 1 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 5 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 1 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
The Guardian
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale National Pavilion, and 1 more
Biography

Alongside Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros, José Clemente Orozco was one of the major muralists of the Mexican Revolution. In spite of losing his left hand and sight in one eye, Orozco persisted in his artistic career, though not without a biting sense of humor and critical eye. Like Rivera and Siqueiros, Orozco studied at the San Carlos Academy for Fine Arts in Mexico City, and painted everyday subjects in a realist style. He studied with Gerardo Murillo, a radical who encouraged his students to reject European influences and embrace Mexican traditions. Bolstered by this, Orozco became increasingly involved with social and political activism through his art. He made easel paintings and caricatures for a radical paper, but his public works would become his greatest legacy—grand murals throughout North America, depicting allegorical scenes of history, uprising, industry, and suffering.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
User
Solo show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 1 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 5 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 1 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
The Guardian
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale National Pavilion, and 1 more
Articles Featuring José Clemente Orozco
This L.A. Delivery Man Amassed One of the World’s Largest Collections of Chicano Art
Sep 30th, 2015
This L.A. Delivery Man Amassed One of the World’s Largest Collections of Chicano Art
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