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Meg Cranston

American, b. 1960

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Meg Cranston

American, b. 1960

166
Followers
Biography

Conceptual artist Meg Cranston creates sculptures and installations with an air of whimsy that often belies the symbolism and deeper implications of the ideas she explores. Her works frequently seem lighthearted—for The Complete Works of Jane Austen (1991), she filled a large weather balloon with all the air necessary to read Austen’s entire oeuvre out loud—while other pieces carry more serious references. Magical Death (2007), a display of piñatas fashioned to look like Cranston herself, fused a comical conceit with an implied portrayal of the artist as martyr—to be bashed with sticks as the piñatas would be. Other installation pieces evoke similarly personal themes: for Keep Same Over (1989) she displayed all of her personal belongings in a gallery space, while for One of Each (1990) she exhibited 150 doll figures, catalogued in an inscrutable checklist.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Top emerging
Emerging representation
Represented by up-and-coming galleries.
User
Solo show at a major institution
Hammer Museum
Group
Group show at a major institution
MoMA PS1, and 5 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 2 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 1 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale International Exhibition, and 1 more
Biography

Conceptual artist Meg Cranston creates sculptures and installations with an air of whimsy that often belies the symbolism and deeper implications of the ideas she explores. Her works frequently seem lighthearted—for The Complete Works of Jane Austen (1991), she filled a large weather balloon with all the air necessary to read Austen’s entire oeuvre out loud—while other pieces carry more serious references. Magical Death (2007), a display of piñatas fashioned to look like Cranston herself, fused a comical conceit with an implied portrayal of the artist as martyr—to be bashed with sticks as the piñatas would be. Other installation pieces evoke similarly personal themes: for Keep Same Over (1989) she displayed all of her personal belongings in a gallery space, while for One of Each (1990) she exhibited 150 doll figures, catalogued in an inscrutable checklist.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Top emerging
Emerging representation
Represented by up-and-coming galleries.
User
Solo show at a major institution
Hammer Museum
Group
Group show at a major institution
MoMA PS1, and 5 more
Institution
Collected by a major institution
Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 2 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 1 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Venice Biennale International Exhibition, and 1 more