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Nina Beier

Danish, b. 1975

388 followers
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Nina Beier

Danish, b. 1975

388
Followers
Biography

Nina Beier’s multimedia practice decontextualizes universal cultural symbols to investigate how modes of representation affect contemporary experience. Beier moves between social and institutional critique in sculptures, wall works, and installations that combine materials connected to both art history and the global economy. In her extended “Portrait Mode” series, Beier creates prismatic abstract compositions by stuffing secondhand fabrics (chosen for their bold colors and animal prints) within traditional frames. The works recall abstract expressionism and the Arte Povera movement while simultaneously referring to commodity culture and its attendant controversies. Extending the language of Dada, Beier’s sculptures and performances often veer toward the absurd. For the playfully existential Tragedy (2011), Beier invited several dogs to play dead on an ornate antique rug, each one leaving behind a rainbow of residual hair as reminder of the event.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Blue chip status
Blue chip representation
Represented by internationally reputable galleries.
Group
Group show at a major institution
Palais de Tokyo, and 3 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 2 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Biennale of Sydney, and 3 more
Biography

Nina Beier’s multimedia practice decontextualizes universal cultural symbols to investigate how modes of representation affect contemporary experience. Beier moves between social and institutional critique in sculptures, wall works, and installations that combine materials connected to both art history and the global economy. In her extended “Portrait Mode” series, Beier creates prismatic abstract compositions by stuffing secondhand fabrics (chosen for their bold colors and animal prints) within traditional frames. The works recall abstract expressionism and the Arte Povera movement while simultaneously referring to commodity culture and its attendant controversies. Extending the language of Dada, Beier’s sculptures and performances often veer toward the absurd. For the playfully existential Tragedy (2011), Beier invited several dogs to play dead on an ornate antique rug, each one leaving behind a rainbow of residual hair as reminder of the event.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
Blue chip status
Blue chip representation
Represented by internationally reputable galleries.
Group
Group show at a major institution
Palais de Tokyo, and 3 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 2 more
Fair
Included in a major biennial
Biennale of Sydney, and 3 more