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Qin Fengling

Chinese, b. 1957

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Qin Fengling

Chinese, b. 1957

Biography

Qin Fengling’s innovative approach to painting inspired one critic to describe her style as “pop-pointillism”. With no formal training in art, Qin eschews traditional techniques, instead squeezing acrylic color directly from the tube onto her canvas and forming the resulting globs of paint into tiny figures. Qin forms shapes and images from these masses of figures, capturing a sense of China’s vast population and sometimes offering biting social commentary. In Red Flag (2008), a large red flag is comprised of tiny painted figures, suggesting the deindividualized masses underpinning Chinese social structures. At close perspective, viewers may find each figure is slightly different from the next, proposing the individuality of Chinese citizens, despite their service to the country’s larger national identity. “Living in this society at this time,” she says, “leaves scars and marks that can never be erased.”

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Biography

Qin Fengling’s innovative approach to painting inspired one critic to describe her style as “pop-pointillism”. With no formal training in art, Qin eschews traditional techniques, instead squeezing acrylic color directly from the tube onto her canvas and forming the resulting globs of paint into tiny figures. Qin forms shapes and images from these masses of figures, capturing a sense of China’s vast population and sometimes offering biting social commentary. In Red Flag (2008), a large red flag is comprised of tiny painted figures, suggesting the deindividualized masses underpinning Chinese social structures. At close perspective, viewers may find each figure is slightly different from the next, proposing the individuality of Chinese citizens, despite their service to the country’s larger national identity. “Living in this society at this time,” she says, “leaves scars and marks that can never be erased.”

Career Highlights
Related Categories