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Shinique Smith

American, b. 1971

429 followers
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Shinique Smith

American, b. 1971

429
Followers
Biography

Shinique Smith composes her sculptures and installations from found objects and second-hand clothing tied together to form large cubes, bundles, and dense assemblages. Her creations reference a wide array of cultural and art historical themes, from Color Field Painting and other formal movements via the exuberantly colored clothing, to latent commentaries on recycling, materialism, and urban poverty. Her apparently spontaneous, cursive and looping paintings that accompany some of her installations at once point to graffiti and Eastern calligraphic traditions.

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Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
User
Solo show at a major institution
Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and 2 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 4 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 1 more
Biography

Shinique Smith composes her sculptures and installations from found objects and second-hand clothing tied together to form large cubes, bundles, and dense assemblages. Her creations reference a wide array of cultural and art historical themes, from Color Field Painting and other formal movements via the exuberantly colored clothing, to latent commentaries on recycling, materialism, and urban poverty. Her apparently spontaneous, cursive and looping paintings that accompany some of her installations at once point to graffiti and Eastern calligraphic traditions.

Career Highlights
Learn more about artist insights.
User
Solo show at a major institution
Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), and 2 more
Group
Group show at a major institution
The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and 4 more
Publication
Reviewed by a major art publication
Artforum, and 1 more
Shows Featuring Shinique Smith
Articles Featuring Shinique Smith
A Group Show Considers Kafka’s ‘Amerika’ and Otherness in Art
Oct 22nd, 2014
A Group Show Considers Kafka’s ‘Amerika’ and Otherness in Art
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