Spartacus Chetwynd

b. 1973

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The Fairy Feller
Sold on Dec 10, 2014
£5,000
US$7,857
Realized price
Decrease
29% est
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Artwork Info
Textile Arts
paper, paint, papier-mâché, glue and Dutch metal
200 x 150 x 20 cm
Estimate
Realized Price
£5,000
Auction Sale
Dec 10, 2014
Phillips
Description
No artwork image
The Fairy Feller
paper, paint, papier-mâché, glue and Dutch metal
Dec 10, 2014
Phillips
£5,000
US$7,857
Realized price
Decrease
29% est
Reveal more
Artwork Info
Textile Arts
200 x 150 x 20 cm
Estimate
Auction Sale
Dec 10, 2014
Phillips
Realized Price
£5,000
The Fairy Feller, 2003
Sold on Dec 10, 2014
£6,250
US$9,822
Realized price
Decrease
11% est
Reveal more
Artwork Info
Estimate
Realized Price
£6,250
Auction Sale
Dec 10, 2014
Phillips
Description
The Fairy Feller is an enlarged hand-tinted and gold-leafed photocopy of Richard Dadd’s most famous painting. Epitomising the Victorian fervour for the supernatural and occult, Dadd’s canvas shows a fantastical narrative that draws from mythology and literature. Its obsessive detail is often attributed to Dadd’s psychopathy: the painting, made during his long incarceration at Bethlem Hospital, took 9 years to complete. Spartacus Chetwynd appropriated this image to use as a prop in a performance that celebrated radical British visionaries such as William Blake and Mary Wollstonecraft. In the performance, nymphs burst from the painting and danced to music from The Seventh Seal, an Ingmar Bergman film which takes its name from the biblical prophecy of The Final Judgement.
The Fairy Feller, 2003
Dec 10, 2014
Phillips
£6,250
US$9,822
Realized price
Decrease
11% est
Reveal more
Artwork Info
Estimate
Auction Sale
Dec 10, 2014
Phillips
Realized Price
£6,250
Description
The Fairy Feller is an enlarged hand-tinted and gold-leafed photocopy of Richard Dadd’s most famous painting. Epitomising the Victorian fervour for the supernatural and occult, Dadd’s canvas shows a fantastical narrative that draws from mythology and literature. Its obsessive detail is often attributed to Dadd’s psychopathy: the painting, made during his long incarceration at Bethlem Hospital, took 9 years to complete. Spartacus Chetwynd appropriated this image to use as a prop in a performance that celebrated radical British visionaries such as William Blake and Mary Wollstonecraft. In the performance, nymphs burst from the painting and danced to music from The Seventh Seal, an Ingmar Bergman film which takes its name from the biblical prophecy of The Final Judgement.