Abraham Cruzvillegas, ‘Development as Freedom’, 2010, TWO x TWO

Cruzvillegas often stacks organic matter, industrially made objects, or handmade items on top of each other to produce a visual clash. In Development as Freedom, he uses the skateboard as a base on which to carefully balance found wood and a perched dahlia root.

Abraham Cruzvillegas’ work communicates a sincere complexity, fluidity, and vitality. He puts diverse objects from contradictory contexts together in one work, creating a conceptual instability on the verge of collapse. He often stacks organic matter, industrially made objects, or handmade items on top of each other to produce a visual clash. In Development as Freedom, he uses the skateboard as a base on which to carefully balance found wood and a perched dahlia root. The skateboard, a manufactured object used for transportation, is transformed into a rooted plinth, and the dahlia root, an anchoring section of the plant, beautifully transforms into a sprout. Cruzvillegas lives and works in Mexico City and Paris. He has had solo exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Tate Modern, London; The Centre for Contemporary Arts, CCA Glasgow; Museo de Arte Contemporaneo de Oaxaca; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; and Fundación para el Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City. His work has been included in group shows at The Museum of Modern Art Warsaw; Stedelijk Museum, Ámsterdam; Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit; and DOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel. Cruzvillegas work is currently on display in the exhibition Mexico Inside Out: Themes in Art Since 1990 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth.

About Abraham Cruzvillegas

Inspired by the civic-minded and resourceful Ajusco neighborhood in Mexico City where he grew up, Abraham Cruzvillegas creates sculptures, films, and installations that demonstrate the interconnectedness of people and things. Working under the rubric of “Autoconstrucción,” Cruzvillegas employs such common materials as scarves, pieces of fruit, animal feces, and handmade crafts to create a folk art aesthetic. His AC Mobile (2008)—a vehicle made with objects including modified bicycles, a car stereo, video projector, and a tea flask—reflects the DIY nature of both Cruzvillegas’s art and the artist’s ever-shifting identity.

Mexican, b. 1968, Mexico City, Mexico, based in Mexico