Adam Pendleton, ‘Bricks’, 2013, TWO x TWO

Often classified as a Conceptual artist, it is easy to see the movement’s influence on Pendleton in his use of text as the visual document of an event. In Bricks, he silkscreens historic images (featuring brick walls and cinderblocks) with superimposed text (spelling out “INDEPENDANCE”) onto stainless steel panel, ultimately altering the meanings and signs.

Graphic text, stark images, and the silkscreen processes are the methods used by New York-based Adam Pendleton to produce his series of Lab Paintings. The paintings blend facts, ambiguous dates, found text, and appropriated images, ultimately presenting themselves as posters for the artist’s fractured view of the world. Often classified as a Conceptual artist, it is easy to see the movement’s influence on Pendleton in his use of text as the visual document of an event. In Bricks, he silkscreens historic images (featuring brick walls and cinderblocks) with superimposed text (spelling out “INDEPENDANCE”) onto stainless steel panel, ultimately altering the meanings and signs. Adam Pendleton’s work has been exhibited extensively throughout the U.S. and abroad, notably at Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; Studio Museum Harlem; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; and Deutsche Guggenheim, Berlin.

About Adam Pendleton

A conceptual artist whose practice includes silkscreen paintings, photographic collage, video, performance, and publishing, Adam Pendleton is an energizing figure with a reputation on the rise. Much of his work is language-based, including the well-known silkscreen series “Black Dada” (2008-). Beyond the references to the color of these monochromatic works (featuring geometric forms and letters from the titular phrase) and the WWI-era Dada movement, the tile of this series, which Pendleton describes as “a hybrid of poster and something else,” references a 1964 work by the Beat poet Amiri Baraka, Black Dada Nihilismus. “Black Dada is a a way to preach about the future while talking about the past. It is our present moment,” he explains. Sol LeWitt became his first collector when he bought a work he saw of Pendleton’s in his first gallery show; one of the pieces in Pendleton’s series makes explicit reference to LeWitt’s iconic cube.

American, b. 1984, Richmond, Virginia, based in Germantown, New York