Adejoke Tugbiyele, ‘De-winged’, 2015, The Watermill Center Benefit Auction
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De-winged, 2015

Palm stems, steel mesh, perforated metal and wire
32 × 36 in
81.3 × 91.4 cm
Bidding closed
About the work
The Watermill Center Benefit Auction

Nigerian American artist and Queer activist Adejoke Tugbiyele repurposes objects and subsequently …

Image rights
Courtesy of the artist and Rachel Weingeist
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Nigerian-American, b. 1977
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In work ranging from subtle to unflinching, Adejoke Tugbiyele explores LGBTQ human rights issues around the world, and her own identity as a queer woman of Nigerian descent. For her, art and activism are inextricably linked. As she describes, “Activism helps me stay in touch with the issues and ideas I respond to in my work. My work in turn educates and empowers others in the LGBT movement in Nigeria and beyond. Both depend on each other.” In her earlier work, Tugbiyele focused on Nigerian female identity. Though she is now recognized for tackling LGBTQ concerns in her sculptures, textiles, mixed media paintings, drawings, and videos, it was not until 2012 that she felt comfortable enough with her own sexuality to embrace such subjects. She has done this in, for example, expressive sculptures of figures marginalized by society because of their sexuality.

Adejoke Tugbiyele, ‘De-winged’, 2015, The Watermill Center Benefit Auction
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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About the work
The Watermill Center Benefit Auction

Nigerian American artist and Queer activist Adejoke Tugbiyele repurposes objects and subsequently weaves them together, imbued with political connotations dealing with sexuality, women’s rights and human rights. Her work often also reflects spiritual and performative aspects of Yoruba culture. Tugbiyele has been …

Image rights
Courtesy of the artist and Rachel Weingeist
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Nigerian-American, b. 1977
Follow

In work ranging from subtle to unflinching, Adejoke Tugbiyele explores LGBTQ human rights issues around the world, and her own identity as a queer woman of Nigerian descent. For her, art and activism are inextricably linked. As she describes, “Activism helps me stay in touch with the issues and ideas I respond to in my work. My work in turn educates and empowers others in the LGBT movement in Nigeria and beyond. Both depend on each other.” In her earlier work, Tugbiyele focused on Nigerian female identity. Though she is now recognized for tackling LGBTQ concerns in her sculptures, textiles, mixed media paintings, drawings, and videos, it was not until 2012 that she felt comfortable enough with her own sexuality to embrace such subjects. She has done this in, for example, expressive sculptures of figures marginalized by society because of their sexuality.

De-winged, 2015

Palm stems, steel mesh, perforated metal and wire
32 × 36 in
81.3 × 91.4 cm
Bidding closed
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