Adrián Villar Rojas, ‘Where the slaves live’, 2014, Installation, Found Objects, Fondation Louis Vuitton
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Where the slaves live, 2014

Found Objects
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FLV
Fondation Louis Vuitton
Paris

Collection: Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris

Medium
Image rights
© Fondation Louis Vuitton Martin Argyroglo © Adrian Villar Rojas
Adrián Villar Rojas
Argentinean, b. 1980
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Argentine sculptor and 2011 Venice Biennale exhibitor Adrián Villar Rojas produces monumental site-specific works, primarily in clay. The artist first chose the material for its low price and availability, but since then it has come to influence his concept of form. With their crude physicality and cracked surfaces, his sculptures are redolent of ruins, but their forms are more futuristic than antiquated. A person loved me (2012), a towering structure of interconnected pipes created for the New Museum’s 2012 triennial, was a largely site-responsive work for which Villar Rojas and his team improvised new working methods, applying clay to pieces of polystyrene. My dead family (2009) portrayed a life-size whale, made primarily of clay, wood, and rocks, lying beached in a forest in Patagonia. His pieces are typically destroyed after being exhibited, becoming a sort of temporary performance. “I really love the idea of not having a body of work,” says Villar Rojas, who lists comic books and grunge music as influences.

Adrián Villar Rojas, ‘Where the slaves live’, 2014, Installation, Found Objects, Fondation Louis Vuitton
Save
Save
Share
Share
FLV
Fondation Louis Vuitton
Paris

Collection: Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris

Medium
Image rights
© Fondation Louis Vuitton Martin Argyroglo © Adrian Villar Rojas
Adrián Villar Rojas
Argentinean, b. 1980
Follow

Argentine sculptor and 2011 Venice Biennale exhibitor Adrián Villar Rojas produces monumental site-specific works, primarily in clay. The artist first chose the material for its low price and availability, but since then it has come to influence his concept of form. With their crude physicality and cracked surfaces, his sculptures are redolent of ruins, but their forms are more futuristic than antiquated. A person loved me (2012), a towering structure of interconnected pipes created for the New Museum’s 2012 triennial, was a largely site-responsive work for which Villar Rojas and his team improvised new working methods, applying clay to pieces of polystyrene. My dead family (2009) portrayed a life-size whale, made primarily of clay, wood, and rocks, lying beached in a forest in Patagonia. His pieces are typically destroyed after being exhibited, becoming a sort of temporary performance. “I really love the idea of not having a body of work,” says Villar Rojas, who lists comic books and grunge music as influences.

Where the slaves live, 2014

Found Objects
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Other works from Installment 1: Inaugural Exhibition
Other works by Adrián Villar Rojas
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