Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘Skull Skate Decks’, 2014, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘Skull Skate Decks’, 2014, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘Skull Skate Decks’, 2014, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Jean-Michel Basquiat, ‘Skull Skate Decks’, 2014, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera

Accompanied by hinges to hang. New in original shrink wrap.

Created under the auspices of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, with Estate copyright.

32 x 8 x 1.5 in (81.28 x 20.32 x 3.81 cm) - Dimensions apply to each.

These skateboards, made of Canadian maple, represent part of a painting of one of the most famous underground artists of the 1980s in New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat. The patterns illustrated on the plate –graffiti, flames, teeth, conceptual words, creatures, as well as voodoo, and superheroes from vintage comics– are typical of the wild and original universe of the artist.

Indeed, these very popular skate decks have been selling at auction for up to $5,500 USD. Edition unknown. This set of three of skate decks features images from Basquiat's 1981 work Untitled (Skull). Images of the head were often of central focus in the artist's work, and here he presents to the viewer a face that seems incomplete with bones poking through the surface. Graffiti covers the head, making it a fragmented image composed of abstract lines and shapes. Each of the three decks comes in the original shrinkwrap and each is in mint condition. Created under the auspices of the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Another edition exactly like this set sold on June 11, 2017 for US $3,000. See here
--Courtesy of Alpha 137 Gallery

About Jean-Michel Basquiat

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

American, 1960-1988, New York, New York, based in New York, New York