Alain Jacquet, ‘Thomas Eakins Swimming Hole’, 1966-1968, Print, Colour screen printing on mansonite, PIASA
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Alain Jacquet

Thomas Eakins Swimming Hole, 1966-1968

Colour screen printing on mansonite
40 1/5 × 60 3/5 in
102 × 154 cm
Bidding closed
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PIASA

(D): 102 × 154 cm

Signed, titled and dated on the back

Buyer responsible for Buyer’s Premium and …

Medium
Alain Jacquet
French, 1939–2008
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Associated with the French Nouveau Réalisme and American Pop art movements, Alain Jacquet was celebrated for his playful investigations into the nature of images, from mass media photographs and advertisements to NASA’s pictures of Earth and canonical Old Master and modern paintings. “It’s a visual, formal thing,” he once explained. “I’m fascinated by the way a picture can break down into the tiniest abstract elements close up, then reappear as a pictorial image.” The abstract elements to which he refers are Ben Day dots, famously co-opted by his contemporary, Roy Lichtenstein. These appeared in many of Jacquet’s paintings and photo-screened compositions, enlarged into abstract patterns or used as the building blocks of his images. Among his best-known works, which brought him early notice, is Déjeuner sur l’herbe (1964), his tongue-in-cheek restaging of Manet’s masterpiece, rendered entirely in Ben Day dots.

Alain Jacquet, ‘Thomas Eakins Swimming Hole’, 1966-1968, Print, Colour screen printing on mansonite, PIASA
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
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P
PIASA

(D): 102 × 154 cm

Signed, titled and dated on the back

Buyer responsible for Buyer’s Premium and any applicable taxes, including VAT.

Medium
Alain Jacquet
French, 1939–2008
Follow

Associated with the French Nouveau Réalisme and American Pop art movements, Alain Jacquet was celebrated for his playful investigations into the nature of images, from mass media photographs and advertisements to NASA’s pictures of Earth and canonical Old Master and modern paintings. “It’s a visual, formal thing,” he once explained. “I’m fascinated by the way a picture can break down into the tiniest abstract elements close up, then reappear as a pictorial image.” The abstract elements to which he refers are Ben Day dots, famously co-opted by his contemporary, Roy Lichtenstein. These appeared in many of Jacquet’s paintings and photo-screened compositions, enlarged into abstract patterns or used as the building blocks of his images. Among his best-known works, which brought him early notice, is Déjeuner sur l’herbe (1964), his tongue-in-cheek restaging of Manet’s masterpiece, rendered entirely in Ben Day dots.

Alain Jacquet

Thomas Eakins Swimming Hole, 1966-1968

Colour screen printing on mansonite
40 1/5 × 60 3/5 in
102 × 154 cm
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
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