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Alan Feltus

Dream, 1993

Oil on linen
10 × 8 in
25.4 × 20.3 cm
Bidding closed
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
D
Doyle
Signature
Signed Alan Feltus (ur), dated 1993 (ul), signed Alan Feltus, dated 1993 and inscribed as titled on the stretcher
Alan Feltus
American, b. 1943
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Enamored with the artists of the Italian Renaissance, American-born Alan Feltus lives in Italy and paints portraits that reflect the work of his Renaissance forbears. Using a Neoclassical style, Feltus stages scenes in which stylized figures—usually pairs of languid women painted in a warm palette of yellows, oranges, and greens—cast sidelong glances that bespeak their alienation or detachment from one another. Feltus is concerned with capturing the complexities and drama of human relationships, which he conveys through compositional tension and visual clues that hint at hidden narrative, such as manuscripts, books, and letters. Feltus paints his figures from imagination and direct observation of his own body, which accounts for the simplified and timeless nature of their forms: “Because I paint using mirrors, observing parts of myself rather than models, I might say that all my paintings are to some degree self-portraits,” he has said.

navigate left
navigate right
Save
Save
view
View in room
share
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Save
Save
view
View in room
share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Provenance
D
Doyle
Signature
Signed Alan Feltus (ur), dated 1993 (ul), signed Alan Feltus, dated 1993 and inscribed as titled on the stretcher
Alan Feltus
American, b. 1943
Follow

Enamored with the artists of the Italian Renaissance, American-born Alan Feltus lives in Italy and paints portraits that reflect the work of his Renaissance forbears. Using a Neoclassical style, Feltus stages scenes in which stylized figures—usually pairs of languid women painted in a warm palette of yellows, oranges, and greens—cast sidelong glances that bespeak their alienation or detachment from one another. Feltus is concerned with capturing the complexities and drama of human relationships, which he conveys through compositional tension and visual clues that hint at hidden narrative, such as manuscripts, books, and letters. Feltus paints his figures from imagination and direct observation of his own body, which accounts for the simplified and timeless nature of their forms: “Because I paint using mirrors, observing parts of myself rather than models, I might say that all my paintings are to some degree self-portraits,” he has said.

Alan Feltus

Dream, 1993

Oil on linen
10 × 8 in
25.4 × 20.3 cm
Bidding closed
Other works by Alan Feltus