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Alberto Giacometti, ‘L'homme au doigt’, 1947, Christie's
Alberto Giacometti, ‘L'homme au doigt’, 1947, Christie's
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L'homme au doigt, 1947

Bronze with patina and hand-painted by the artist
69 9/10 in
177.5 cm
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About the work
Exhibition history
Bibliography
Provenance
C
Christie's
Signature
Signed and numbered 'A Giacometti 6/6' (on the top of the base); inscribed with foundry mark 'Alexis Rudier Fondeur Paris' (on the back of …
Alberto Giacometti
Swiss, 1901–1966
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Alberto Giacometti is best known for his elongated, withered representations of the human form, including his 1960 sculpture Walking Man I, which in 2010 broke the record for a work of art at auction at $104.3 million. After experimenting with Cubism and Surrealism in forms influenced by primitive art, psychoanalytic theory, and toys, Giacometti broke from Surrealism and began his radical revision of the representational tradition in sculpture. Giacometti's severe figures explored the psyche and the charged space occupied by a single person. Linked to Jean-Paul Sartre and existentialism, they are seen as metaphors for the postwar experience of doubt and alienation.

Alberto Giacometti, ‘L'homme au doigt’, 1947, Christie's
Alberto Giacometti, ‘L'homme au doigt’, 1947, Christie's
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Bibliography
Provenance
C
Christie's
Signature
Signed and numbered 'A Giacometti 6/6' (on the top of the base); inscribed with foundry mark 'Alexis Rudier Fondeur Paris' (on the back of …
Alberto Giacometti
Swiss, 1901–1966
Follow

Alberto Giacometti is best known for his elongated, withered representations of the human form, including his 1960 sculpture Walking Man I, which in 2010 broke the record for a work of art at auction at $104.3 million. After experimenting with Cubism and Surrealism in forms influenced by primitive art, psychoanalytic theory, and toys, Giacometti broke from Surrealism and began his radical revision of the representational tradition in sculpture. Giacometti's severe figures explored the psyche and the charged space occupied by a single person. Linked to Jean-Paul Sartre and existentialism, they are seen as metaphors for the postwar experience of doubt and alienation.

L'homme au doigt, 1947

Bronze with patina and hand-painted by the artist
69 9/10 in
177.5 cm
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Series by this artist