Alberto Giacometti, ‘‘Tête de femme’ table lamp’, designed 1937-later cast, Phillips

Michel Butor, Diego Giacometti, Paris, 1985, p. 59
Françoise Francisci, Diego Giacometti: Catalogue de l’œuvre, Volume I, Paris, 1986, pp. 26 , 27
Daniel Marchesseau, Diego Giacometti, Paris, 1986, pp. 11, 35
Diego Giacometti, Möbel und Objekte aus Bronze, exh. cat., Museum Bellrive, 1988, Zurich, p. 30
Christian Boutonnet and Rafael Ortiz, Diego Giacometti, exh. cat., L'Arc en Seine, Paris, 2003, p. 35
Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean-Michel Frank: un décorateur dans le Paris des années 30, Paris, 2009, p. 122

Lauren Bacall, New York
Bonhams, New York, '20th Century Decorative Arts', December 17, 2015, lot 1023
Acquired from the above by the present owner

About Alberto Giacometti

Alberto Giacometti is best known for his elongated, withered representations of the human form, including his 1960 sculpture Walking Man I, which in 2010 broke the record for a work of art at auction at $104.3 million. After experimenting with Cubism and Surrealism in forms influenced by primitive art, psychoanalytic theory, and toys, Giacometti broke from Surrealism and began his radical revision of the representational tradition in sculpture. Giacometti's severe figures explored the psyche and the charged space occupied by a single person. Linked to Jean-Paul Sartre and existentialism, they are seen as metaphors for the postwar experience of doubt and alienation.

Swiss, 1901-1966, Borgonovo, Switzerland