Alberto Giacometti, ‘"Tête de femme" table lamp’, designed circa 1933-later cast, Phillips
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Alberto Giacometti

"Tête de femme" table lamp, designed circa 1933-later cast

Patinated bronze, paper shade.
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About the work
Bibliography
Provenance
P
Phillips

Property from a Private Collection, France

Height of cast: 19 7/8 in. (50.4 cm), including shade: …

Medium
Alberto Giacometti
Swiss, 1901–1966
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Alberto Giacometti is best known for his elongated, withered representations of the human form, including his 1960 sculpture Walking Man I, which in 2010 broke the record for a work of art at auction at $104.3 million. After experimenting with Cubism and Surrealism in forms influenced by primitive art, psychoanalytic theory, and toys, Giacometti broke from Surrealism and began his radical revision of the representational tradition in sculpture. Giacometti's severe figures explored the psyche and the charged space occupied by a single person. Linked to Jean-Paul Sartre and existentialism, they are seen as metaphors for the postwar experience of doubt and alienation.

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Alberto Giacometti, ‘"Tête de femme" table lamp’, designed circa 1933-later cast, Phillips
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Save
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About the work
Bibliography
Provenance
P
Phillips

Property from a Private Collection, France

Height of cast: 19 7/8 in. (50.4 cm), including shade: 27 7/8 in. (70.7 cm) high

Reverse impressed AG 33. Together with a certificate of authenticity from the Comité Giacometti.

From the Catalogue:
The present lot is registered by the Fondation Alberto and Annette Giacometti …

Medium
Alberto Giacometti
Swiss, 1901–1966
Follow

Alberto Giacometti is best known for his elongated, withered representations of the human form, including his 1960 sculpture Walking Man I, which in 2010 broke the record for a work of art at auction at $104.3 million. After experimenting with Cubism and Surrealism in forms influenced by primitive art, psychoanalytic theory, and toys, Giacometti broke from Surrealism and began his radical revision of the representational tradition in sculpture. Giacometti's severe figures explored the psyche and the charged space occupied by a single person. Linked to Jean-Paul Sartre and existentialism, they are seen as metaphors for the postwar experience of doubt and alienation.

Alberto Giacometti

"Tête de femme" table lamp, designed circa 1933-later cast

Patinated bronze, paper shade.
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by this artist? Consign with Artsy.
Series by this artist
Other works by Alberto Giacometti
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Surrealism