Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art
Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art
Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art
Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art
Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art
Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art
Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art
Alexander Calder, ‘Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)’, 1968, Graves International Art

An original one page lithograph on smooth wove paper by American artist Alexander Calder (1898-1976) titled "Derriere Le Miroir No. 173 (front cover)", 1968. Edition issued by Galerie Maeght for "Derrière le Miroir No. 173". Published by Maeght, Paris, October 1968. Text by Giovanni Cardente and Jacques Dupin. Sheet size: 15" x 11.125". Being a front cover page, there is some wear associated with age and handling. Very good condition.

In October 1945, the French art dealer Aimé Maeght opens his art gallery at 13 Rue de Téhéran in Paris. His beginning coincides with the end of Second World War and the return of a number of exiled artists back to France. The magazine Derriere Le Miroir was created in October 1946 and published without interruption until 1982. Maeght's ambition in establishing his print shop and his publication magazine Derriere Le Miroir was to make available to a broader audience less expensive printed imagery by the artists of his time, many whom were represented by his Paris gallery. Its original articles and illustrations (mainly original color lithographs by the gallery artists) were famous at the time.

The magazine covered only the artists exhibited by Maeght gallery either through personal or group exhibitions. Among them are (in alphabetical order): Henri-Georges Adam, Pierre Alechinsky, Bacon, Jean Bazaine, Georges Braque, Pol Bury, Alexander Calder, Marc Chagall, Roger Chastel, Eduardo Chillida, Alberto Giacometti, Vassily Kandinsky, Ellsworth Kelly, Fernand Léger, Lindner, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró, Jacques Monory, Pablo Palazuelo, Paul Rebeyrolle, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Saul Steinberg, Pierre Tal-Coat, Antoni Tapies, Raoul Ubac, Bram van Velde.

Series: "Derrière le Miroir No. 173

Image rights: Copyright © Graves International Art

Publisher: Maeght Editeur

About Alexander Calder

American artist Alexander Calder changed the course of modern art by developing an innovative method of sculpting, bending, and twisting wire to create three-dimensional “drawings in space.” Resonating with the Futurists and Constructivists, as well as the language of early nonobjective painting, Calder’s mobiles (a term coined by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe his work) consist of abstract shapes made of industrial materials––often poetic and gracefully formed and at times boldly colored––that hang in an uncanny, perfect balance. His complex assemblage Cirque Calder (1926–31), which allowed for the artist’s manipulation of its various characters presented before an audience, predated Performance Art by some 40 years. Later in his career, Calder devoted himself to making outdoor monumental sculptures in bolted sheet steel that continue to grace public plazas in cities throughout the world.

American, 1898-1976, Lawnton, Pennsylvania