Alexander Calder, ‘McGovern for McGovernment’, 1972, Alpha 137 Gallery
Alexander Calder, ‘McGovern for McGovernment’, 1972, Alpha 137 Gallery

In 1972, Alexander Calder was commissioned by the DNC to create a series of prints as a fundraiser for Democratic presidential candidate George McGovern. Rendered in Calder's signature colorful graphic style, the series playfully opposes dour-faced incumbent President Nixon and the United States' deadly involvement in the Vietnam War. Calder was fiercely opposed to the Vietnam War, so like many artists, he supported the Quixotic, but ultimately doomed Presidential candidacy of the ultra-liberal George McGovern. Indeed, despite Calder's best artistic efforts., Richard Nixon went on to win the election in a landslide. Unframed and in fine condition.Acquired from the collection of Bob Brand and Liz Werthan, two well known art collectors and philanthropists in Philadelphia.

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Signature: Pencil signed and numbered from the edition of 200 on the recto (front). Bears Styria Studio's distinctive blind stamp.

Publisher: Styria Studio, Inc. New York

Acquired from the collection of Bob Brand and Liz Werthan, two well known art collectors and philanthropists in Philadelphia.

About Alexander Calder

American artist Alexander Calder changed the course of modern art by developing an innovative method of sculpting, bending, and twisting wire to create three-dimensional “drawings in space.” Resonating with the Futurists and Constructivists, as well as the language of early nonobjective painting, Calder’s mobiles (a term coined by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe his work) consist of abstract shapes made of industrial materials––often poetic and gracefully formed and at times boldly colored––that hang in an uncanny, perfect balance. His complex assemblage Cirque Calder (1926–31), which allowed for the artist’s manipulation of its various characters presented before an audience, predated Performance Art by some 40 years. Later in his career, Calder devoted himself to making outdoor monumental sculptures in bolted sheet steel that continue to grace public plazas in cities throughout the world.

American, 1898-1976, Lawnton, Pennsylvania