Alexander Calder, ‘Signed Note to Jack Kyle, World Trade Center Engineer for the Port Authority of New York, on Stamped and Postmarked (Franked) Postcard of Calder Sculpture’, 1969, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Alexander Calder, ‘Signed Note to Jack Kyle, World Trade Center Engineer for the Port Authority of New York, on Stamped and Postmarked (Franked) Postcard of Calder Sculpture’, 1969, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera
Alexander Calder, ‘Signed Note to Jack Kyle, World Trade Center Engineer for the Port Authority of New York, on Stamped and Postmarked (Franked) Postcard of Calder Sculpture’, 1969, Alpha 137: Prints and Exhibition Ephemera

This is a fascinating postcard which Alexander Calder sent to Jack Kyle from his home in Sache, (France) - dated 1969 January 8. Calder addresses the card To Jack Kyle, Port of New York Authority, New York City. The note reads (rather intriguingly) "On the 17 Jan I have an 'object' going by Air France to New York would you mind calling Klaus Perls & giving him a hand/Sandy Calder". Jack Kyle was the chief engineer for the Port Authority, who also played a heroic role in the original design of the World Trade Center. And Klaus Perls of course was, famously, Calder's dealer of record for most of his career.

Alexander Calder's World Trade Center Stabile, also known by other names like Bent Propeller, The Cockeyed Propeller and Three Wings, was created in 1969 - the year this postcard was sent, and arrived at the WTC in 1970. It was 25 feet in height and was made out of painted red steel. The piece was originally commissioned for the entrance to 1 World Trade Center on West Street. After Battery Park City was opened, the piece was moved to Vesey and Church Streets. It was moved in 1970 to a plaza in front of 7 World Trade Center, on the northeast corner of the World Trade Center Plaza by Vesey Street and Church Street.The work was destroyed in 2001 in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, crushed under thousands of tons of rubble when 7 World Trade Center collapsed. About 40 percent of the sculpture was recovered from the debris in the following months. With not enough of the original remaining for a restoration, the recovered elements were stored by the Calder Foundation. Today, a portion of the sculpture can be found at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum.
In his capacity as Chief Engineer of the Port Authority, which commissioned Calder's historic work, Jack Kyle worked closely with the artist on the project. This is a wonderful and rather intriguing piece of art historical ephemera. Note that the image depicted on Calder's postcard is a different Calder sculpture - not to be confused with the one that he would create for the WTC.
--Courtesy of Alpha 137 Gallery

Signature: Signed "Sandy Calder" in ink.

Acquired from a well established professional autograph dealership, which provided a formal Certificate of Authenticity - though that was not necessary for us as there is no question as to the authenticity of this piece of Calder ephemera.

About Alexander Calder

American artist Alexander Calder changed the course of modern art by developing an innovative method of sculpting, bending, and twisting wire to create three-dimensional “drawings in space.” Resonating with the Futurists and Constructivists, as well as the language of early nonobjective painting, Calder’s mobiles (a term coined by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe his work) consist of abstract shapes made of industrial materials––often poetic and gracefully formed and at times boldly colored––that hang in an uncanny, perfect balance. His complex assemblage Cirque Calder (1926–31), which allowed for the artist’s manipulation of its various characters presented before an audience, predated Performance Art by some 40 years. Later in his career, Calder devoted himself to making outdoor monumental sculptures in bolted sheet steel that continue to grace public plazas in cities throughout the world.

American, 1898-1976, Lawnton, Pennsylvania