Alexander Calder, ‘Untitled (The Drawing of Flower); Various Drawings and Letters’, Sotheby's
Alexander Calder, ‘Untitled (The Drawing of Flower); Various Drawings and Letters’, Sotheby's
Alexander Calder, ‘Untitled (The Drawing of Flower); Various Drawings and Letters’, Sotheby's
Alexander Calder, ‘Untitled (The Drawing of Flower); Various Drawings and Letters’, Sotheby's
Alexander Calder, ‘Untitled (The Drawing of Flower); Various Drawings and Letters’, Sotheby's
Alexander Calder, ‘Untitled (The Drawing of Flower); Various Drawings and Letters’, Sotheby's
Alexander Calder, ‘Untitled (The Drawing of Flower); Various Drawings and Letters’, Sotheby's

Property from the Collection of Otis and Velma Dozier

i. 20 3/4 by 26 in. 52.7 by 66 cm.
ii. Smallest: 10 by 7 1/2 in. 25.4 by 19.1 cm.; Largest: 13 by 8 in. 33 by 20.3 cm.

i. Executed in 1949, this work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A14993.
ii. Executed in 1931-1949, these works are registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under 6 application numbers:

Untitled (Installation Drawing for Flower)
graphite on paper
11 by 8 1/2 in. 27.9 by 21.6 cm.
Executed in 1949, this work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A14992.
Provenance:
Roberta Camp, Dallas (gift of the artist)
Otis and Velma Dozier, Dallas
Thence by descent to the present owner in 1988

Untitled (Drawing of Gémissement Oblique and Circulation)
graphite on paper
11 by 8 1/2 in. 27.9 by 21.6 cm.
Executed in 1931, this work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A14994.
Provenance:
Otis and Velma Dozier, Dallas (gift of the artist)
Thence by descent to the present owner in 1988

Untitled (Drawing of Untitled, Cadre Rouge, a Universe, and two Spheres)
graphite on paper
11 by 8 1/2 in. 27.9 by 21.6 cm.
Executed in 1949, this work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A14995.
Provenance:
Otis and Velma Dozier, Dallas (gift of the artist)
Thence by descent to the present owner in 1988

Untitled (Drawing of Object with Red Discs and Untitled)
graphite on paper
11 by 8 1/2 in. 27.9 by 21.6 cm.
Executed in 1949, this work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A14996.
Provenance:
Otis and Velma Dozier, Dallas (gift of the artist)
Thence by descent to the present owner in 1988

Untitled (Drawing of the Circle and Untitled)
graphite on paper
11 by 8 1/2 in. 27.9 by 21.6 cm.
Executed in 1949, this work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A14997.
Provenance:
Otis and Velma Dozier, Dallas (gift of the artist)
Thence by descent to the present owner in 1988

Untitled (Drawing of Oiseau sur l'Arbre)
graphite on paper
11 by 8 1/2 in. 27.9 by 21.6 cm.
Executed in 1949, this work is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A14998.
Provenance:
Otis and Velma Dozier, Dallas (gift of the artist)
Thence by descent to the present owner in 1988
From the Catalogue
Otis and Velma Dozier were pillars of the Dallas art scene from the 1930s onward, helping to establish the city as a major hub for burgeoning artists and center for Contemporary Art. Otis Dozier was himself an acclaimed artist, member of the Dallas Artists League and the Dallas Nine artists group. Dozier’s work, characterized by vibrant colors and a push toward abstraction, was selected for the First National Exhibition of American Art in New York in 1936 and the American Art Today exhibition shown during the 1939 World’s Fair in New York. He won many significant awards for his work, including one from New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1933. It was during the 1930s that the Dallas art scene became noticed by the global arts community, thanks in large part to the contributions of the Doziers.

Velma had seen a show in 1947/48 featuring Calder’s whimsical jewelry creations and fell in love with his work. When Calder came to visit Dallas in 1948, the Doziers gave Calder a tour of the city and Otis’ workshop, and thus began a several decades-long friendship between Otis & Velma Dozier and Sandy and Louisa Calder. Calder wrote in a letter following this trip:

6 Dec 48
Dear Mr. & Mrs. Dozier,
I’m sorry to have taken so long to write and thank you for being so kind to Louisa and me that day we came down in Dallas… I hope you will come to Roxbury sometime and I will take great pleasure in showing you my shop. I remember your various workshops with a great deal of interest – especially the stone cutting apparatus.
Cordially yours,
Sandy Calder

Otis and Velma had a close relationship to the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts (now called the Dallas Museum of Art), and when the couple’s friend and Dallas socialite Roberta Camp decided to plan an exhibition for the 1949 Dallas Flower Club, Velma immediately thought of Calder’s work. Calder agreed to create a large scale mobile commission, titled Flower, which would be the museum’s first purchase of Postwar art. As he was finalizing the work, Calder wrote a letter to Roberta Camp, care of Otis, in March 1949, and included with his letter drawings and diagrams of the mobile, seen in the present lot.

8 Mar 49
Dear Mrs. Camp,
I think this diagram will be better than a photo. There are 3 hooks, and they should go together so that the whole object could be in a vertical plane (if it would stay there) with the small extremities pointing away from the large extremities – the only exception is the 2 blue wires – with flower which point out, one to each side…It would be well to hang the ‘object’ low, so that the horizontal will be visible. The parts that catch the wind best are the 4 discs in vertical planes at the top – therefore play the fan on these. It need not be very large – but the breeze may be best when intermittent…I will pack and ship it in a few days, as soon as it is quite dry.
Cordial greetings to you all,
Sandy Calder

This mobile, Flower (1949), is still in the collection of the Dallas Museum of Art, thanks to the Dozier’s relationship with Sandy Calder. The Doziers and Calders maintained a close friendship in the decades that followed, with the Doziers paying Calder several visits to his studio in Roxbury. During a 1949 trip to Roxbury, Calder bestowed two significant gifts upon the Doziers: a small standing mobile titled Pup (lot 15), featuring a little dog with a red wagging tongue and blue bouncing ears, and a brooch with Velma’s initials, VD (lot 11). Sotheby’s is honored to present these special and personalized works from the Collection of Otis and Velma Dozier.
—Courtesy of Sotheby's

Signature: i. inscribed with the artist's name and date 8 Mar 49

i. Roberta Camp, Dallas (gift of the artist in 1949)
Otis and Velma Dozier, Dallas
Thence by descent to the present owner in 1988
ii. See above for complete provenance information

About Alexander Calder

American artist Alexander Calder changed the course of modern art by developing an innovative method of sculpting, bending, and twisting wire to create three-dimensional “drawings in space.” Resonating with the Futurists and Constructivists, as well as the language of early nonobjective painting, Calder’s mobiles (a term coined by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe his work) consist of abstract shapes made of industrial materials––often poetic and gracefully formed and at times boldly colored––that hang in an uncanny, perfect balance. His complex assemblage Cirque Calder (1926–31), which allowed for the artist’s manipulation of its various characters presented before an audience, predated Performance Art by some 40 years. Later in his career, Calder devoted himself to making outdoor monumental sculptures in bolted sheet steel that continue to grace public plazas in cities throughout the world.

American, 1898-1976, Lawnton, Pennsylvania