Amanda Heng, ‘Chong Li Sze - Makedo Getby - www.stpi.com.sg/AH-wearetheworldtheseareourstories2017/lisze-makedogetby.htm’, 2016, STPI

This work is part of We Are the World - These Are Our Stories, a unique presentation of a single work consisting of 24 parts that combines Heng’s collaborative and process-driven approach with the techniques of print and papermaking to highlight the power of storytelling and the processes of art making. Embodying broad themes of history and memory, Heng’s explorations with the STPI Workshop has led to a multidisciplinary production that encompasses both performance as well as visual elements. Spun around the stories of twelve individuals, the work captures Heng’s performative practice on paper and invites the viewer to rediscover the reconstructed significance of another’s cherished belongings, as well as the intimate memories tied to them.

In collaboration with twelve participants, Heng used the treasured objects or heirlooms offered by these individuals as starting points for an exploratory process of sharing (or “performances” as Heng calls them). The resulting work becomes, as according to writer June Yap, “memory in form, in trance, as lived, and as art”.

In collaboration with twelve participants, Heng used the treasured objects or heirlooms offered by these individuals as starting points for an exploratory process of sharing (or “performances” as Heng calls them). The resulting work becomes, as according to writer June Yap, “memory in form, in trance, as lived, and as art”.

Paired with QR codes that transport viewers into the virtual realm, such a tool lends more than a multilayered dimension to the work; they are also an interal part of the viewer’s experience that transforms their passivity into active “participants”, as they enter and delve deeper into each storytelling experience beyond the boundaries of the physical space.

About Amanda Heng

One of Singapore’s pioneering contemporary artists, Amanda Heng approaches art as a tool for change, and, to that end, produces collaborative, multidisciplinary performances, public art projects, and installations through which she critically examines such pressing social issues as collective memory, national identity, and gender politics. Other people are central to her work. As such, she was one of the founding members of Singapore’s first artist-run space (Artists’ Village, 1988) and founded the country’s first female artists collective (Women in the Arts Collective, 1999). As she states: “I don’t want to be an isolated figure.” Heng’s Let’s Walk (begun 1999) exemplifies this ethos. For these performances, she and other women held high-heeled shoes in their mouths while walking backwards down streets in cities worldwide—a scathing indictment of the privileging of women’s looks over their professional capacities.

Sinaporean, b. 1951

Group Shows

2013

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