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Amy Sherald, ‘They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake’, 2009, National Museum of Women in the Arts
Amy Sherald, ‘They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake’, 2009, National Museum of Women in the Arts
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Amy Sherald

They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake, 2009

Oil on canvas
54 × 43 in
137.2 × 109.2 cm
About the work
Medium
Painting
Image rights
National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore, in honor of the artist and the 25th Anniversary of NMWA; © Amy …
Amy Sherald
American, b. 1973
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Through her monumental portraits of African American subjects, Amy Sherald explores alternate narratives of blackness through the exclusion of color from the notion of race. The Baltimore-based artist is best known for her stylized, figurative paintings of vibrantly dressed individuals rendered in grayscale skin tones against flat, highly-saturated backgrounds that evoke a sense of timeless identity. “I’m painting the paintings that I want to see in museums,” she said. “And I’m hopefully presenting them in a way that’s universal enough that they become representative of something different than just a black body on a canvas.” Sherald was the first woman to win the Smithsonian’s Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition grand prize with her 2016 entry Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance). Former First Lady Michelle Obama tapped Sherald to paint her official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., which was unveiled in early 2018 alongside Kehinde Wiley’s likeness of President Barack Obama.

Amy Sherald, ‘They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake’, 2009, National Museum of Women in the Arts
Amy Sherald, ‘They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake’, 2009, National Museum of Women in the Arts
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Medium
Painting
Image rights
National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore, in honor of the artist and the 25th Anniversary of NMWA; © Amy …
Amy Sherald
American, b. 1973
Follow

Through her monumental portraits of African American subjects, Amy Sherald explores alternate narratives of blackness through the exclusion of color from the notion of race. The Baltimore-based artist is best known for her stylized, figurative paintings of vibrantly dressed individuals rendered in grayscale skin tones against flat, highly-saturated backgrounds that evoke a sense of timeless identity. “I’m painting the paintings that I want to see in museums,” she said. “And I’m hopefully presenting them in a way that’s universal enough that they become representative of something different than just a black body on a canvas.” Sherald was the first woman to win the Smithsonian’s Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition grand prize with her 2016 entry Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance). Former First Lady Michelle Obama tapped Sherald to paint her official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., which was unveiled in early 2018 alongside Kehinde Wiley’s likeness of President Barack Obama.

Amy Sherald

They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake, 2009

Oil on canvas
54 × 43 in
137.2 × 109.2 cm
Other works by Amy Sherald
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