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Andy Warhol's Personal Collection of 48-Impressionist & Contemporary Art Auction Catalogues, with Sotheby's 1988 Warhol Estate Sale Box Set , 1970-80's

Lithograph on paper
12 × 8 in
30.5 × 20.3 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
Sold
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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Andy Warhol's Personal Collection of 48-Impressionist & Contemporary Art Auction …

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Andy Warhol's Personal Collection of 48-Impressionist & Contemporary Art Auction Catalogues, 1970-80's, 48 Contemporary Catalogues, Ex. Lot from the Andy Warhol Estate Sale Sotheby's NY 1988, included original Sotheby's Warhol Auction Tag from the Andy Warhol Estate Sale at Sotheby's, NY in …

Read more
Medium
Books and Portfolios
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Sotheby's, Christie's, Phillips
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Jean-Michel Basquiat
American, 1960–1988
Follow

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

Keith Haring
American, 1958–1990
Follow

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

Robert Rauschenberg
American, 1925–2008
Follow

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

Jackson Pollock
American, 1912–1956
Follow

Major Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, dubbed "Jack the Dripper" by Time magazine in 1956, is best known for his large "action" or drip paintings of 1947–52, formed by pouring and manipulating liquid paint atop canvases set on the floor. A wholly original, rule-shattering figure in American art, Pollock inspired Frank Stella, Richard Serra, and the Color Field painters. Pollock's early Surrealist works of personal symbols and abstract figures show the influence of José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Max Ernst, as well as his experiences with Jungian psychotherapy.

Robert Motherwell
American, 1915–1991
Follow

Alongside Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell is considered one of the great American Abstract Expressionist painters. His esteemed intellect not only undergirded his gorgeous, expressive paintings—frequently featuring bold black shapes against fields of color—but also made Motherwell one of the leading writers, theorists, and advocates of the New York School. He forged close friendships with the European Surrealists and other intellectuals over his interests in poetry and philosophy, and as such served as a vital link between the pre-war avant-garde in Europe and its post-war counterpart in New York, establishing automatism and psychoanalysis as central concerns of American abstraction. "It's not that the creative act and the critical act are simultaneous," Motherwell said. "It's more like you blurt something out and then analyze it.

Paul Klee
German, 1879–1940
Follow

Known for his unique pictorial language and innovative teachings at the Bauhaus, Paul Klee had far-reaching influence on 20th-century modernism. In an early attempt to master color, he associated himself with the group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), working closely with friend and future Bauhaus colleague Wassily Kandinsky. While engaged with artistic theory, Klee also admired children’s art, wanting his own style to be similarly unaffected. And his dream-like pictures made him popular with the Surrealists, though he never officially became one. Klee’s work can be humorous, his fantastic drawn subjects conveying a playful sense of absurdity, as with his famous Twittering Machine (1922). Later in his career, he began to build up thicker painted surfaces and simplify his compositions, replacing precise line-work with fewer, bolder forms. Klee’s art and lessons on color theory would greatly impact later generations of artists, including, significantly, the Abstract Expressionists and Color Field painters.

Bruce Nauman
American, b. 1941
Follow

Using an array of media including video installation, performance, sculpture, and photography, Bruce Nauman is known for conceptual works that explore space, language, and the body. Nauman infuses his pieces with irony and humor, creating verbal and visual puns to often-unsettling effect, challenging viewers and making them aware of their own physicality. Nauman’s neon works explore the semantic and metaphorical possibilities that arise from subtly rearranging a few letters, such as in Run from Fear, Fun from Rear (1972).

Lucio Fontana
Italian, Argentine born, 1899–1968
Follow

Throughout his prolific career, Lucio Fontana demonstrated a relentless interest in the relationship between surface and dimensionality. Fontana formulated the theory of Spatialism in a series of manifestos dating from the late 1940s to early 1950s, proposing that matter should be infiltrated by energy in order to generate dimensional, dynamic artistic forms. Fontana implemented this theory in his series Concetto Spaziale (‘spatial concept’), punching holes in the picture plane and slicing through his canvases in order to expose the dimensional space beneath. Fontana’s innovative theories prefigured later developments in environmental art, performance art, and Arte Povera.

Arshile Gorky
Armenian-American, 1904–1948
Follow

Arshile Gorky was one of the last great Surrealist painters and a major influence on (and early figure in) Abstract Expressionism. After emigrating to the U.S. in 1920, he devoted himself to apprenticeships in the style of other artists before developing his own personal vision. Through his friendships with Surrealist André Breton and painter Roberto Matta, he was introduced to automatic drawing and biomorphic imagery. Gorky's innovative, explosive landscapes used an abstract vocabulary to convey memories of his Armenian childhood alongside direct observations of nature.

Roy Lichtenstein
American, 1923–1997
Follow

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

Gerhard Richter
German, b. 1932
Follow

Gerhard Richter is known for a prolific and stylistically varied exploration of the medium of painting, often incorporating and exploring the visual effects of photography. “I like everything that has no style: dictionaries, photographs, nature, myself and my paintings,” he says. “Because style is violent, and I am not violent.” In the early 1960s, Richter began to create large-scale photorealist copies of black-and-white photographs rendered in a range of grays, and innovated a blurred effect (sometimes deemed “photographic impressionism”) in which portions of his compositions appear smeared or softened—paradoxically reproducing photographic effects and revealing his painterly hand. With heavily textured abstract gray monochromes, Richter introduced abstraction into his practice, and he has continued to move freely between figuration and abstraction, producing geometric “Colour Charts”, bold, gestural abstractions, and “Photo Paintings” of anything from nudes, flowers, and cars to landscapes, architecture, and scenes from Nazi history. Richter absorbed a range of influences, from Caspar David Friedrich and Roy Lichtenstein to Art Informel and Fluxus.

Dan Flavin
American, 1933–1996
Follow

Utilizing fluorescent light tubing available on the commercial market, Dan Flavin created light installations (or “situations” as he preferred to call them) that became icons of Minimalism. Flavin’s wall- and floor-mounted, site-specific fixtures, composed of intersecting and parallel lines of light in conventional colors, flood spaces with their glow. A number of the sculptures feature tubes traversing corners or doorways, or at a right angle to the wall, further engaging the architecture of a room. As Flavin’s installations grew more complex, so too did the spaces built expressly for the purpose of exhibiting them. In 1959, when Flavin was shortly employed as a guard and elevator operator at the Museum of Modern Art, he met fellow Minimalists Sol LeWitt, Robert Mangold, and Robert Ryman.

Dan Graham
American, b. 1942
Follow

Dan Graham’s interest in the social implications of systems, popular culture, and architecture is articulated in his installations, conceptual pieces, performances, videos, architectural designs, and prolific writing. Graham began using video as a medium in the 1970s as a way to engage his viewers directly, while attempting to restructure perceptions of time and space—a motive carried into his later glass and mirror pavilions. Circularity and feedback are major themes in Graham’s works, evidenced by his frequent use of mirrors, participation, and sometimes two cameras to create a loop. His influences include Larry Bell, Robert Mangold, Sol LeWitt, and Mies van der Rohe. In spite of his contributions to the legacy of media and installation art, Graham is still uncomfortable considering himself a professional artist.

Kenny Scharf
American, b. 1958
Follow

Muralist, painter, sculptor, and installation artist Kenny Scharf is best known for his fantastical, large-scale paintings of anthropomorphic animals and imagined creatures, as in Viva Mare Viva Mar (2011). Though Scharf’s brightly colored imagery is generally playful, he has remarked that darker themes exist beneath the surface of his works, visible upon closer inspection. Scharf was a part of the 1980s East Village Art movement, along with his good friend and fellow street artist Keith Haring. The artist says he has been influenced by all 20th-century art movements, including Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art, the latter reflected in his appropriation of cartoon characters from television shows like the Flintstones and Jetsons and his humorous depiction of snack food in Maple Glazed Donut Over Fertile Landscape (2011). Scharf’s oftentimes dense and frenetic compositions also echo a Baroque sensibility.

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Navigate right
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Save
View
View in room
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About the work
Provenance
VINCE fine arts/ephemera
Follow

Andy Warhol's Personal Collection of 48-Impressionist & Contemporary Art Auction …

Read more

Andy Warhol's Personal Collection of 48-Impressionist & Contemporary Art Auction Catalogues, 1970-80's, 48 Contemporary Catalogues, Ex. Lot from the Andy Warhol Estate Sale Sotheby's NY 1988, included original Sotheby's Warhol Auction Tag from the Andy Warhol Estate Sale at Sotheby's, NY in …

Read more
Medium
Books and Portfolios
Signature
Not signed, not signed
Certificate of authenticity
Included
Frame
Not included
Publisher
Sotheby's, Christie's, Phillips
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Jean-Michel Basquiat
American, 1960–1988
Follow

A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat had honed his signature painting style of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

Keith Haring
American, 1958–1990
Follow

Bridging the gap between the art world and the street, Keith Haring rose to prominence in the early 1980s with his graffiti drawings made in the subways and on the sidewalks of New York City. Combining the appeal of cartoons with the raw energy of Art Brut artists like Jean DuBuffet, Haring developed a distinct pop-graffiti aesthetic centered on fluid, bold outlines against a dense, rhythmic overspread of imagery like that of babies, barking dogs, flying saucers, hearts, and Mickey Mouse. In his subway drawings and murals, Haring explored themes of exploitation, subjugation, drug abuse, and rising fears of nuclear holocaust, which became increasingly apocalyptic after his AIDS diagnosis. Alongside Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf, and Jenny Holzer, Haring is regarded as a leading figure in New York East Village Art scene in the 1970s and '80s.

Robert Rauschenberg
American, 1925–2008
Follow

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

Jackson Pollock
American, 1912–1956
Follow

Major Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock, dubbed "Jack the Dripper" by Time magazine in 1956, is best known for his large "action" or drip paintings of 1947–52, formed by pouring and manipulating liquid paint atop canvases set on the floor. A wholly original, rule-shattering figure in American art, Pollock inspired Frank Stella, Richard Serra, and the Color Field painters. Pollock's early Surrealist works of personal symbols and abstract figures show the influence of José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Joan Miró, and Max Ernst, as well as his experiences with Jungian psychotherapy.

Robert Motherwell
American, 1915–1991
Follow

Alongside Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, and Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell is considered one of the great American Abstract Expressionist painters. His esteemed intellect not only undergirded his gorgeous, expressive paintings—frequently featuring bold black shapes against fields of color—but also made Motherwell one of the leading writers, theorists, and advocates of the New York School. He forged close friendships with the European Surrealists and other intellectuals over his interests in poetry and philosophy, and as such served as a vital link between the pre-war avant-garde in Europe and its post-war counterpart in New York, establishing automatism and psychoanalysis as central concerns of American abstraction. "It's not that the creative act and the critical act are simultaneous," Motherwell said. "It's more like you blurt something out and then analyze it.

Paul Klee
German, 1879–1940
Follow

Known for his unique pictorial language and innovative teachings at the Bauhaus, Paul Klee had far-reaching influence on 20th-century modernism. In an early attempt to master color, he associated himself with the group Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), working closely with friend and future Bauhaus colleague Wassily Kandinsky. While engaged with artistic theory, Klee also admired children’s art, wanting his own style to be similarly unaffected. And his dream-like pictures made him popular with the Surrealists, though he never officially became one. Klee’s work can be humorous, his fantastic drawn subjects conveying a playful sense of absurdity, as with his famous Twittering Machine (1922). Later in his career, he began to build up thicker painted surfaces and simplify his compositions, replacing precise line-work with fewer, bolder forms. Klee’s art and lessons on color theory would greatly impact later generations of artists, including, significantly, the Abstract Expressionists and Color Field painters.

Bruce Nauman
American, b. 1941
Follow

Using an array of media including video installation, performance, sculpture, and photography, Bruce Nauman is known for conceptual works that explore space, language, and the body. Nauman infuses his pieces with irony and humor, creating verbal and visual puns to often-unsettling effect, challenging viewers and making them aware of their own physicality. Nauman’s neon works explore the semantic and metaphorical possibilities that arise from subtly rearranging a few letters, such as in Run from Fear, Fun from Rear (1972).

Lucio Fontana
Italian, Argentine born, 1899–1968
Follow

Throughout his prolific career, Lucio Fontana demonstrated a relentless interest in the relationship between surface and dimensionality. Fontana formulated the theory of Spatialism in a series of manifestos dating from the late 1940s to early 1950s, proposing that matter should be infiltrated by energy in order to generate dimensional, dynamic artistic forms. Fontana implemented this theory in his series Concetto Spaziale (‘spatial concept’), punching holes in the picture plane and slicing through his canvases in order to expose the dimensional space beneath. Fontana’s innovative theories prefigured later developments in environmental art, performance art, and Arte Povera.

Arshile Gorky
Armenian-American, 1904–1948
Follow

Arshile Gorky was one of the last great Surrealist painters and a major influence on (and early figure in) Abstract Expressionism. After emigrating to the U.S. in 1920, he devoted himself to apprenticeships in the style of other artists before developing his own personal vision. Through his friendships with Surrealist André Breton and painter Roberto Matta, he was introduced to automatic drawing and biomorphic imagery. Gorky's innovative, explosive landscapes used an abstract vocabulary to convey memories of his Armenian childhood alongside direct observations of nature.

Roy Lichtenstein
American, 1923–1997
Follow

When American Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein painted Look Mickey in 1961, it set the tone for his career. This primary-color portrait of the cartoon mouse introduced Lichtenstein’s detached and deadpan style at a time when introspective Abstract Expressionism reigned. Mining material from advertisements, comics, and the everyday, Lichtenstein brought what was then a great taboo—commercial art—into the gallery. He stressed the artificiality of his images by painting them as though they’d come from a commercial press, with the flat, single-color Ben-Day dots of the newspaper meticulously rendered by hand using paint and stencils. Later in his career, Lichtenstein extended his source material to art history, including the work of Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso, and experimented with three-dimensional works. Lichtenstein’s use of appropriated imagery has influenced artists such as Richard Prince, Jeff Koons, and Raymond Pettibon.

Gerhard Richter
German, b. 1932
Follow

Gerhard Richter is known for a prolific and stylistically varied exploration of the medium of painting, often incorporating and exploring the visual effects of photography. “I like everything that has no style: dictionaries, photographs, nature, myself and my paintings,” he says. “Because style is violent, and I am not violent.” In the early 1960s, Richter began to create large-scale photorealist copies of black-and-white photographs rendered in a range of grays, and innovated a blurred effect (sometimes deemed “photographic impressionism”) in which portions of his compositions appear smeared or softened—paradoxically reproducing photographic effects and revealing his painterly hand. With heavily textured abstract gray monochromes, Richter introduced abstraction into his practice, and he has continued to move freely between figuration and abstraction, producing geometric “Colour Charts”, bold, gestural abstractions, and “Photo Paintings” of anything from nudes, flowers, and cars to landscapes, architecture, and scenes from Nazi history. Richter absorbed a range of influences, from Caspar David Friedrich and Roy Lichtenstein to Art Informel and Fluxus.

Dan Flavin
American, 1933–1996
Follow

Utilizing fluorescent light tubing available on the commercial market, Dan Flavin created light installations (or “situations” as he preferred to call them) that became icons of Minimalism. Flavin’s wall- and floor-mounted, site-specific fixtures, composed of intersecting and parallel lines of light in conventional colors, flood spaces with their glow. A number of the sculptures feature tubes traversing corners or doorways, or at a right angle to the wall, further engaging the architecture of a room. As Flavin’s installations grew more complex, so too did the spaces built expressly for the purpose of exhibiting them. In 1959, when Flavin was shortly employed as a guard and elevator operator at the Museum of Modern Art, he met fellow Minimalists Sol LeWitt, Robert Mangold, and Robert Ryman.

Dan Graham
American, b. 1942
Follow

Dan Graham’s interest in the social implications of systems, popular culture, and architecture is articulated in his installations, conceptual pieces, performances, videos, architectural designs, and prolific writing. Graham began using video as a medium in the 1970s as a way to engage his viewers directly, while attempting to restructure perceptions of time and space—a motive carried into his later glass and mirror pavilions. Circularity and feedback are major themes in Graham’s works, evidenced by his frequent use of mirrors, participation, and sometimes two cameras to create a loop. His influences include Larry Bell, Robert Mangold, Sol LeWitt, and Mies van der Rohe. In spite of his contributions to the legacy of media and installation art, Graham is still uncomfortable considering himself a professional artist.

Kenny Scharf
American, b. 1958
Follow

Muralist, painter, sculptor, and installation artist Kenny Scharf is best known for his fantastical, large-scale paintings of anthropomorphic animals and imagined creatures, as in Viva Mare Viva Mar (2011). Though Scharf’s brightly colored imagery is generally playful, he has remarked that darker themes exist beneath the surface of his works, visible upon closer inspection. Scharf was a part of the 1980s East Village Art movement, along with his good friend and fellow street artist Keith Haring. The artist says he has been influenced by all 20th-century art movements, including Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art, the latter reflected in his appropriation of cartoon characters from television shows like the Flintstones and Jetsons and his humorous depiction of snack food in Maple Glazed Donut Over Fertile Landscape (2011). Scharf’s oftentimes dense and frenetic compositions also echo a Baroque sensibility.

Andy Warhol's Personal Collection of 48-Impressionist & Contemporary Art Auction Catalogues, with Sotheby's 1988 Warhol Estate Sale Box Set , 1970-80's

Lithograph on paper
12 × 8 in
30.5 × 20.3 cm
This is ephemera, an artifact related to the artist.
Sold
Certificate
Certificate of authenticity
This work includes a certificate of authenticity.
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
Other works from ARTephemera (1930-present)
Other works by Andy Warhol
Other works from VINCE fine arts/ephemera
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Most Similar
Books and Portfolios