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ART CASH

Color offset lithograph
Bidding closed
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About the work
D
Doyle

Artwork by Artists: Andy Warhol, Robert Whitman, Robert Rauschenberg, Tom Gormley, Red Grooms and …

Read more

Artwork by Artists: Andy Warhol, Robert Whitman, Robert Rauschenberg, Tom Gormley, Red Grooms and Marisol (Marisol Escobar)
ART CASH
Color offset lithograph, aside from the stamped, signed and numbered edition of 75, framed.

Sheet 30.25 x 22.125 inches; 768 x 562 mm.

Condition: Laid on card and partially front-mounted, …

Read more
Medium
Print
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Robert Whitman
American, b. 1935
Follow

Robert Whitman, a pioneer of multimedia installation and performances, has a long history of collaborating with engineers and scientists, using technology to create images that incorporate live action, specially built props, sound, video, and other visual media. Whitman’s interest in making the unfamiliar familiar informs his entire oeuvre, from the 1970 installation Children and Communications (1970), which enabled kids to connect with kids in other neighborhoods via phone and fax, to SUN (2007), a projection of actual satellite imagery of the sun onto an expanse of fabric positioned on a rooftop in New York. Celestial bodies appear frequently in Whitman’s work, altered in size and appearance.

Robert Rauschenberg
American, 1925–2008
Follow

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

Red Grooms
American, b. 1937
Follow

Red Grooms’ “Ruckus Manhattan” in the mid-1970s humorously transformed Grand Central Terminal into a 3-D caricature of New York City. “I wanted to do a novelistic portrait of Manhattan from Battery Park to Grant’s tomb,” Grooms explained. The comic-book inspired interactive installation included iconic landmarks—the subway, Central Park, the Apollo Theater, the Woolworth building—populated by life-sized wooden figures of prostitutes, thieves, gamblers, tourists, shoppers, and families, revealing the city’s grit as well as its glamour. It was lauded for its effect of turning Manhattan—then threatening and oppressive—into a place of wonder. Since then, Grooms has “made a career of affectionate parody,” according one critic, through satirical, pop culture-infused prints and sculptural tableaux in homage to his adopted city.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

Navigate left
Navigate right
Save
Save
Share
Share
Save
Save
Share
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About the work
D
Doyle

Artwork by Artists: Andy Warhol, Robert Whitman, Robert Rauschenberg, Tom Gormley, Red Grooms and …

Read more

Artwork by Artists: Andy Warhol, Robert Whitman, Robert Rauschenberg, Tom Gormley, Red Grooms and Marisol (Marisol Escobar)
ART CASH
Color offset lithograph, aside from the stamped, signed and numbered edition of 75, framed.

Sheet 30.25 x 22.125 inches; 768 x 562 mm.

Condition: Laid on card and partially front-mounted, …

Read more
Medium
Print
Andy Warhol
American, 1928–1987
Follow

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. As famous for his quips as for his art—he variously mused that “art is what you can get away with” and “everyone will be famous for 15 minutes”—Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Known for his cultivation of celebrity, Factory studio (a radical social and creative melting pot), and avant-garde films like Chelsea Girls (1966), Warhol was also a mentor to artists like Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat. His Pop sensibility is now standard practice, taken up by major contemporary artists Richard Prince, Takashi Murakami, and Jeff Koons, among countless others.

Robert Whitman
American, b. 1935
Follow

Robert Whitman, a pioneer of multimedia installation and performances, has a long history of collaborating with engineers and scientists, using technology to create images that incorporate live action, specially built props, sound, video, and other visual media. Whitman’s interest in making the unfamiliar familiar informs his entire oeuvre, from the 1970 installation Children and Communications (1970), which enabled kids to connect with kids in other neighborhoods via phone and fax, to SUN (2007), a projection of actual satellite imagery of the sun onto an expanse of fabric positioned on a rooftop in New York. Celestial bodies appear frequently in Whitman’s work, altered in size and appearance.

Robert Rauschenberg
American, 1925–2008
Follow

Robert Rauschenberg’s enthusiasm for popular culture and, with his contemporary Jasper Johns, his rejection of the angst and seriousness of the Abstract Expressionists led him to search for a new way of painting. A prolific innovator of techniques and mediums, he used unconventional art materials ranging from dirt and house paint to umbrellas and car tires. In the early 1950s, Rauschenberg was already gaining a reputation as the art world’s enfant terrible with works such as Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953), for which he requested a drawing (as well as permission) from Willem de Kooning, and proceeded to rub away the image until only ghostly marks remained on the paper. By 1954, Rauschenberg completed his first three-dimensional collage paintings—he called them Combines—in which he incorporated discarded materials and mundane objects to explore the intersection of art and life. “I think a picture is more like the real world when it’s made out of the real world,” he said. In 1964 he became the first American to win the International Grand Prize in Painting at the Venice Biennale. The 1/4 Mile or Two Furlong Piece (1981–98), a cumulative artwork, embodies his spirit of eclecticism, comprising a retrospective overview of his many discrete periods, including painting, fabric collage, sculptural components made from cardboard and scrap metal, as well as a variety of image transfer and printing methods.

Red Grooms
American, b. 1937
Follow

Red Grooms’ “Ruckus Manhattan” in the mid-1970s humorously transformed Grand Central Terminal into a 3-D caricature of New York City. “I wanted to do a novelistic portrait of Manhattan from Battery Park to Grant’s tomb,” Grooms explained. The comic-book inspired interactive installation included iconic landmarks—the subway, Central Park, the Apollo Theater, the Woolworth building—populated by life-sized wooden figures of prostitutes, thieves, gamblers, tourists, shoppers, and families, revealing the city’s grit as well as its glamour. It was lauded for its effect of turning Manhattan—then threatening and oppressive—into a place of wonder. Since then, Grooms has “made a career of affectionate parody,” according one critic, through satirical, pop culture-infused prints and sculptural tableaux in homage to his adopted city.

Marisol
Venezuelan, 1930–2016
Follow

Best known for her elegant, eclectic, and poignant yet edgy figurative sculptures, Marisol (born Maria Sol Escobar) makes art across styles and media. Her output encompasses woodcarving and sculptural assemblages, cast metal pieces, ceramics, and works on paper. Marisol, who is influenced by artists such as Willem de Kooning and Andy Warhol, is often grouped with pop art artists, but her work does not lend itself to neat categorization. Strains of pre-Columbian folk art and religious symbolism infuse her pieces, and her figurative assemblages feature portraits of other artists, political leaders, and movie stars. Marisol also makes recreations of iconic news images and tableaux of families, sometimes her own, crafting sculptural scenes from carved stone, neon, Astroturf, and plywood.

ART CASH

Color offset lithograph
Bidding closed
Want to sell a work by these artists? Consign with Artsy.
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